Bergmann's rule


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Related to Bergmann's rule: Gloger's rule

Bergmann's rule

[′bərg·mənz ‚rül]
(ecology)
The principle that in a polytypic wide-ranging species of warm-blooded animals the average body size of members of each geographic race varies with the mean environmental temperature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Connecticut birds and climate change: Bergmann's Rule in the fourth dimension.
The trend of shrinking body size with climate warming at one geographic locality is consistent with predictions based on Bergmann's rule, but no study has examined recent changes in body size variation across latitude, or investigated how range dynamics might alter geographic patterns of body size or other morphological characters under apparent selection for cold-tolerance.
We used linear regression to detect changes in the relationship between body size and latitude between the two time periods, interpreting slopes significantly greater than zero to be support for Bergmann's rule.
We found a positive correlation between body size (PC 1) and degrees north latitude in our preexpansion sample, consistent with Bergmann's rule (Fig.
We also find evidence for breakdown of Bergmann's rule in our comparisons of body size of birds sampled before and after the onset of rapid range expansion at latitudes that correspond to the old northern periphery of the species' range.
This may seem contrary to a principle most biologists were taught in school called Bergmann's Rule.
This is a chance to explain the intraspecific empirical generalization called Bergmann's rule (and its few exceptions): races of warm-blooded species from cooler climates tend to be larger than races of the same species from warmer climates (Ashton et al.
graduate from UH in ecology and evolution, his adviser and UH professor of biology and biochemistry Steven Pennings, and their collaborator Thomas Carefoot from the University of British Columbia opened up a new line of study into Bergmann's rule.
This indicates that Bergmann's rule could reflect that plants from high latitudes provide better food than those from low latitudes.
These latest findings, according to Ho, indicate that studies of Bergmann's rule should consider ecological interactions in addition to the more traditional theories of physiology based on responses to temperature.
Bergmann's rule is debated, but one explanation for it is that larger animals have a lower surface-area-to-volume ratio, allowing them to retain more heat and fare better in cooler climes.