Bering Land Bridge National Preserve


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Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

Address:PO Box 220
Nome, AK 99762

Phone:907-443-2522
Fax:907-443-6139
Web: www.nps.gov/bela/
Size: 2,697,393 acres.
Established: Proclaimed as Bering Land Bridge National Monument on December 1, 1978; established as a national preserve on December 2, 1980.
Location:On the northern Seward Peninsula in northwestern Alaska. Western boundary lies 42 miles from the Bering Strait and the United States-Russia fishing boundary. There are no roads that lead directly into the preserve, and summer access is usually by bush planes and small boats. Winter access is mostly by small planes on skis, by snowmachine, or by dog sleds.
Facilities:Bunkhouse-style cabin (sleeps 15-20).
Activities:Camping, hiking, fishing, coastal boating, bird-watching, wildlife viewing, hunting, snowmobiling, cross-country skiing.
Special Features:Preserve is a remnant of the land bridge that once connected Asia with North America more than 13,000 years ago. Paleontological and archeological resources abound, and large populations of migratory birds nest here. Ash explosion craters and lava flows, rare in the Arctic, are also present. The preserve and surrounding areas include native villages, offering opportunities to observe and learn about traditional subsistence lifestyles and historic reindeer herding.

See other parks in Alaska.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other protected areas that could be affected by proposed oil development include the Alaska Maritime and Selawik National Wildlife Refuges, the Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, and Cape Krusenstern National Monument.
Despite these conditions, after 10 years of painstaking work at Bering Land Bridge National Preserve, Schaaf, who's now based at Katmai National Park, has added significantly to our understanding of the people who crossed from Asia to North America during the last ice age.
A link between the drop in Yukon River king salmon and global warming was presented, and participants stated that global warming has caused Cape Krusenstern National Monument and Bering Land Bridge National Preserve to lose pack ice and shoreline due to the erosion caused by storm waves.