Berith


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Berith

(bē`rĭth), abbreviation of Baal-berithBaal-berith
[Heb.,=Lord of the covenant], local god of Shechem mentioned in the Book of Judges. It has been suggested that the Israelites and local inhabitants of Shechem ratified a covenant there in the temple of Baal.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Chris James, the barrister representing Sturdey, said her assets included land at Beth Berith but the value of the land might be affected by the fact that Mr Sturdey was still buried there.
Officers are appealing for information regarding Mr Sturdey at his Beth Berith address in 2008.
The covenant on which I want to focus, however, is the first specific mention of berith in the Hebrew scriptures (Genesis 6-9): the covenant between YHWH and the living earth, established through Noah.
26) The Hebrew word berith, translated as covenant (alliance), has several slightly different acceptations depending on the Biblical context in which it is used (the Noahic covenant, the Abrahamic covenant, the Mosaic covenant, the covenant in the Deuteronomy or the covenant with Jeremiah): "For the word can also mean more generally "promise", which is also a parallel with "oath" to express a solemn pledge.
We saw that commensalism Was readily practiced also with ritualistic strangers, but as is natural Elsewhere only within the circle of either permanent berith affiliates?
9 The 2nd Annual Wellshire Golf Berith Jacobson AMEN OPEN Course (303)-744-0200 Sept.
Pili Pala's new collection has been inspired by company founder Berith Lochery's Danish roots.
We know, from correspondence between the MPPDA and B'Nai Berith, a prominent Jewish civil rights organization, that intense negotiations were undertaken in order to avoid casting blame upon the Jews.
Holy berith beris, beris rede ynowgh; The thristilcok, the popyngay daunce in euery bow.
Fletcher for Richard Royston, 1653), 1, that (contrary to puritans like Ames and Anglicans like Sparke) the covenant of grace in the New Testament, whether called berith or diatheke, is always bilateral and conditional "and never a testament.