Götz von Berlichingen

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Berlichingen, Götz von

(göts` fən bĕr`lĭkhĭng-ən), 1480–1562, German knight and adventurer. The head of a band of free soldiers, he lost (1504) his right hand in the battle of Landshut and wore an iron one in its place. His forays against various cities earned him popular fame. He reluctantly agreed to lead the peasants of Franconia during the Peasants' War (1524–26) but deserted them before their defeat. In 1542 he served with Holy Roman Emperor Charles V against the Turks and two years later fought against the French. His memoirs inspired Goethe's drama Götz von Berlichingen (1773).

Götz von Berlichingen:

see Berlichingen, Götz vonBerlichingen, Götz von
, 1480–1562, German knight and adventurer. The head of a band of free soldiers, he lost (1504) his right hand in the battle of Landshut and wore an iron one in its place. His forays against various cities earned him popular fame.
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Berlichingen, Götz (Gottfried) Von

 

Born 1480; died July 23, 1562. German imperial knight.

In 1514, while in the service of Duke Ulrich of Württem-berg, Berlichingen took part in the suppression of the “Poor Conrad” uprising. During the Peasants’ War (1524–26), Berlichingen found himself in personal conflict with the Swabian League and on Apr. 27, 1525, at the urgent request of W. Hipler, was chosen as commander of one of the peasant detachments in Franconia (the so-called Bright Detachment). At the end of May 1525, before a decisive battle with the troops of the Swabian League, he betrayed the peasants. Berlichingen wrote an autobiography (Lebensbeschreibung Herrn Gö tzes von Berlichingen, published by A. Leitzmann, 1916), in which he emerges as a typical representative of the decadent German piratical knighthood.

References in classic literature ?
We stopped at the very same inn which the famous old robber-knight and rough fighter Go"tz von Berlichingen, abode in after he got out of captivity in the Square Tower of Heilbronn between three hundred and fifty and four hundred years ago.
As stated in the previous article of this series, , the German mercenary Gotz von Berlichingen had in 1508 a pair of technologically advanced iron hands made after he lost his right arm in the Battle of Landshut.
By comparison, though encountering more infantry divisions, the Americans fought the ill-trained and undermanned 17th ss Panzer grenadier division Goetz von Berlichingen, and the 2nd ss Panzer division Das Reich.
At the same time, as Goethe's play Gotz yon Berlichingen with the iron hand illustrates, if you lend someone an appendage, there is no guarantee that you will get it back, particularly if you are the sovereign.
Leaving aside the return to Hellenism, he traces the various steps of that return which started with Goethe's Goetz von Berlichingen (1771), examplifying a "superficial, or at least external" (214) type of medievalism centering on "[a]dventure, romance in the frankest sense, grotesque individualism" (214) of which Goethe and Scott are the true instances.
Goethe illustrates his idea of how this transmission of tradition is so perfectly achieved in Gotz von Berlichingen, where Maria teaches her young nephew the story of the pious child.
His lithographs illustrating Shakespeare's Hamlet and Goethe's play Gotz yon Berlichingen appeared in 1843.
In 1508, the German mercenary Gotz von Berlichingen had a pair of technologically advanced iron hands made after he lost his right arm in battle.
Scott's first publications, during the 1790's, were translations of Burger's ballads "Der Wilder Jager" ("The Wild Huntsman," mentioned above) and "Lenore," and of Goethe's 1773 historical verse drama Gotz yon Berlichingen mit der Eisernen Hand.