Berlioz


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Berlioz

Hector (Louis) . 1803--69, French composer, regarded as a pioneer of modern orchestration. His works include the cantata La Damnation de Faust (1846), the operas Les Troyens (1856--59) and Béatrice et Bénédict (1860--62), the Symphonie fantastique (1830), and the oratorio L'Enfance du Christ (1854)
References in periodicals archive ?
Hector Berlioz and Franz Liszt also met the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra personally.
They later separated, although Berlioz continued to support her.
Recent Berlioz research has focused on various nontraditional topics, such as reception history in different countries, and Berlioz's biographical background within diverse interdisciplinary and intertextual contexts.
Ten essays are included, five on Berlioz, and five on Debussy and his contemporaries.
David Loder has not had the chance to build such impressive records as Cecil but Berlioz must be the biggest threat, although Gold Academy is no pushover.
Much of the criticism of Berlioz stemmed from the sprawling and panoramic scope of his works.
Berlioz redesigned the full, modern manner of orchestration as we know it today with the Symphonie fantastique in 1830, so there are certain conventions we expect to be observed.
In this, fourth and final performance of the mini-festival, Neal Gittleman will lead the Orchestra in celebrating the massive contributions Berlioz made to classical music.
They confirm that Berlioz scholarship is not only alive and well (thanks to the herculean efforts of editors, biographers, and archival researchers over the past half-century) but moving into a new phase: one which draws Berlioz into sophisticated conversation with literature, visual culture, and aesthetics, allowing his music to speak on its own terms.
Not shy about placing ``Manzanar'' in the grand tradition of classical music, Nagano compares the work's structure to certain works by Berlioz, including ``La Damnation de Faust,'' ``Romeo et Juliette'' and the curio ``Lelio.
Saloman (music, Baruch College and Graduate Center, City University of New York)has revised a number of her essays on musicology in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and added a previously unpublished work for this look at the reception of classical music in Paris, London and Boston, particularly that of Hector Berlioz and the Ninth Symphony of Beethoven.