Luini, Bernardino

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Luini, Bernardino

(bārnärdē`nō lo͞oē`nē), c.1480–1532, b. Luino, Italian painter, son of Giovanni Lutero. Among the extant works of his early years (before 1510) are a Pietà (Santa Maria della Passione, Milan) and Madonna and Child with St. John (National Gall., London), in the manner of the Lombard school. He soon came under the influence of Leonardo da Vinci, whose style he echoed for the rest of his life. Thus his paintings, particularly of the Madonna, are characterized by a serenity and grace distilled from his master. Panels of the Madonna and Child are in the Brera, Milan; the Cincinnati Art Museum; and the Louvre. He executed many large works in towns near Milan: the altarpiece for the church at Legnano; frescoes for Santa Maria Miracoli at Saronno; the Crucifixion in Santa Maria degli Angioli, Lugano; and works in the cathedral at Como. These paintings are marked by an inventive quality, with enchanting landscape backgrounds filled with delightful details. Other works include Modesty and Vanity (San Diego) and a portrait and several mythological paintings (National Gall. of Art, Washington, D.C.).
References in periodicals archive ?
58 The composition is based on a work by Bernardino Luini, Portrait of a Boy (of three years?
His father, Biagio, had a post in the works of Milan Cathedral and was a friend of Bernardino Luini, whose Leonardesque Salome With John the Baptist's Head (c.
They include works by Claude Lorrain, Metsu, Van der Werff and Teniers from the collection of the Landgraf von Hessen Kassel, seized as plunder for Josephine by General Lagrange, a Paulus Potter study of a wolf hound that she acquired at auction, and a Bernardino Luini, a gift from the Milanese painter Andrea Appiani.
Following Via Nassa, a promenade of portici (archways that were used by fishermen to spread out their nets) and designer boutiques, I stumble upon the Santa Maria degli Angioli church and admire 16th-century frescos of the Christ Crucifixion and the Last Supper by Bernardino Luini, a disciple of Leonardo da Vinci.
He associated with philosophers and other scholars and knew the son of Bernardino Luini, a student of Leonardo, who had notes and sketchbooks given to him when the master left Milan, site of most of his experiments (2).