Berossus


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Berossus

(bərŏ`səs), 3d cent. B.C., Babylonian priest-historian; contemporary of ManethoManetho
, fl. 300 B.C., Egyptian historian, a priest at Heliopolis, under Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II. His work, covering the history of Egypt from legendary times to 323 B.C.
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. His work, in Greek, preserved Mesopotamian myths regarding creation and history. It survives in fragments quoted by Josephus and Eusebius of Caesarea.
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also literary evidence: The Babylonian priest Berossus, writing in Greek in the Hellenistic period, recorded that the Achaemenid king Artaxerxes II introduced statues of the goddess Anahita to the sanctuaries of several major cities throughout the Empire.
Kvanvig demonstrates the interaction of traditions from the most ancient pre-Atrahasis Babylonian manuscript traditions down to the relatively late historian, Berossus.
Berossus andManetho, Introduced and Translated: Native Traditions in Ancient Mesopotamia and Egypt.
Arnold draws on current Assyriological data to trace the geopolitical realities behind literary references to Babylonians by ancient classical historians such as Herodotus and Berossus and by authors of the Bible.
For example, the tradition preserved by Berossus (FGH 680 F 7d) of the marriage of Amytis, daughter of Astyages, to Nebuchadnezzar is not mentioned.
The Babylonian Berossus reports that his boat landed near the mountains of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Robert's interpretation that the original statue was of Ahura-Mazda and served to substantiate the introduction of cult statues by Artaxerxes II, as maintained by Berossus.
2) According to Berossus, Neriglissar married a daughter of Am[bar{e}]l-Marduk (Sack, Neriglissar, 27).