Bertrada

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Bertrada

(bĕrträ`də), d. 783, Frankish queen, wife of Pepin the ShortPepin the Short
(Pepin III), c.714–768, first Carolingian king of the Franks (751–68), son of Charles Martel and father of Charlemagne. Succeeding his father as mayor of the palace (741), he ruled Neustria, Burgundy, and Provence, while his brother Carloman (d.
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 and mother of CharlemagneCharlemagne
(Charles the Great or Charles I) [O.Fr.,=Charles the great], 742?–814, emperor of the West (800–814), Carolingian king of the Franks (768–814).
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. She tried without success to reconcile Charlemagne and his brother CarlomanCarloman,
751–71, son of Pepin the Short. He and his brother, Charlemagne, shared the succession to their father's kingdom; Carloman ruled the southern portion. Attempts to end rivalry between the brothers failed, and when Carloman died Charlemagne seized his domain.
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. Also called Bertha of the Big Foot or Queen Goosefoot, she figures in Carolingian legend.
References in classic literature ?
Who are you then, Sir Knight, who has bared your steel and faced death for Bertrade, daughter of Simon de Montfort, Earl of Leicester?
An' whither may you be bound, Lady Bertrade de Montfort?
Ride on," he called to Bertrade de Montfort, "I will join you in an instant.
Now he rode once more with lowered visor, and in silence, a little to the rear of Bertrade de Montfort that he might watch her face, which, of a sudden, had excited his interest.
It is the first command I have obeyed since I turned sixteen, Bertrade de Montfort," he said.
The grim humor of the situation was too much for the outlaw, and, when added to his new desire to be in the company of Bertrade de Montfort, he made no effort to resist, but hastened to accept the warm welcome.
An' he may send the barons naked home as he did the King's soldiers," laughed Bertrade de Montfort.
I, too, have seen some wonderful sword play," said Bertrade de Montfort, "and that today.
His stay at the castle of Stutevill was drawn out to three days, and then, on the third day, as he sat with Bertrade de Montfort in an embrasure of the south tower of the old castle, he spoke once more of the necessity for leaving and once more she urged him to remain.
To be with you, Bertrade of Montfort," he said boldly, "I would forego any other pleasure, and endure any privation, or face any danger, but there are others who look to me for guidance and my duty calls me away from you.
Goodbye, Bertrade de Montfort," and he bent to one knee, as he raised her fingers to his lips.