Bessarion


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Bessarion

(bĕsâr`ēən), 1395?–1472, Byzantine humanist, cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. He was a leading figure at the Council of Ferrara-FlorenceFerrara-Florence, Council of,
1438–45, second part of the 17th ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church; the first part was the Council of Basel, canonically convened but after 1437 schismatic (see Basel, Council of).
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, which he attended as metropolitan of Nicaea. He favored ending the schism between East and West, and when the Orthodox Church refused, he joined the Roman Catholic Church and remained in Italy. He was made a cardinal in 1439, and in 1463 the pope named him patriarch of Constantinople. A projected translation into Latin of Ptolemy was completed by his protégés, Purbach and RegiomontanusRegiomontanus
[Lat.,=belonging to the royal mountain, i.e., to Königsberg], 1436–76, German astronomer and mathematician, b. Königsberg. His original name was Johannes Müller.
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. His fine collection of Greek manuscripts was the nucleus of St. Mark's library, Venice.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is just next to highway 401, 404 and Don Valley Parkway, only three minutes' walk to Bessarion subway station and 7 minutes' walk to Go Train station.
But from the mid 15th century Plato was destined to make a forceful comeback, in particular through the influence of Greek orthodox theologians like the scholar Cardinal Bessarion (1403-1472).
In Pienza, 145, I confused barbate with the bearded Cardinal Bessarion.
Edizioni Liturgiche, 2000); the eleventh-century Bessarion Manuscript, also known as Grotta Ferrata, dr.
However the Renaissance proper was sharpened and refined, as Blum's collection justly shows, by the impact of great Platonists like Gemistos Plethon and Cardinal Bessarion, key players in the Unification Council of Ferrara/Florence (1438/39), the failure of which was one of the great misfortunes of European history.
Bessarion, Egor Zaitsev, Masha Kravtsova, Tegin, Biryukov and others.
At the request of both Pope Nicholas V and Bessarion, George of Trebizond translated into Latin at least eleven great works of the Greek fathers.
Examples include Bessarion B (Figure 7) and Segner C (Figure 8).
Astrolabes and angels, epigrams and enigmas; from Regiomontanus' acrostic for Cardinal Bessarion to Piero della Francesca's Flagellation of Christ.
This manuscript is also known as the Bessarion codex; the ordination of the deaconess appears in Goat, Euchologion, 218-22.
in an introduction which is as deft as it is dense, readers have been provided with an authoritative account of his intellectual formation in the household of Cardinal Bessarion, his association with Georgios Trapezuntios and his immersion in the classicizing culture of mid-century Rome and Florence, his return to Castile in 1453 as the fall of Constantinople was followed by the death of Alvaro de Luna, and his political ups and downs over the next forty years.