Bessus


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Bessus

braggart soldier in the Miles Gloriosus tradition. [Br. Lit.: Walsh Modern, 55]
References in periodicals archive ?
Bessus is pragmatic: "But came not I up when the day was gone and redeemed all?
But the authors invite us to give Mardonius that credibility here; Bessus is such an identifiable type, the miles gloriosus, that we are encouraged not only to share Mardonius's certainty about him, but to approach subsequent characters with a similar means of typological evaluation, and a similar certainty as to their type.
For just as Mardonius correctly reads Bessus as a generic type, so he reads Arbaces, but this time incorrectly.
Since Arbaces is magnificent and ludicrous, an evaluation that demands exclusivity must read one of these two qualities as false, artificial, or erroneous, whether that evaluation is Mardonius's or Thomas Rymer's: "And far from decorum is it, that we find the King drolling and quibling with Bessus and his Buffoons, and worse, that they should presume to break their jests upon him.
His embrace of his tragic identity is the fulfillment of the choice offered him by his two counselors in this matter: Mardonius and Bessus, who, one after another, offer a reading of the situation.
Darius 111 although fled to Ecbatan1 for the sake of his life but was treacherously captured by his own satrap Bessus who afterward killed him.
He was a rebel from Afghanistan named Bessus who, for a very brief period before he was executed, led a resistance movement against Alexander the Great.
John Harrells' Bessus, an indomitably cowardly miles gloriosus, was a delight to watch and to listen to; and Jason Guy, who is absolutely mesmerizing to watch simply move around the stage, gave a great deal of care and attention to the crucial expository speeches it falls to Gobrias to speak at the end of the play.
In the play, Mardonius stands in a critical relationship to both the absolutist King Arbaces of the upper plot and the cowardly, pandering Bessus of the lower.
The eleventh edition of the Britannica identifies the false Artaxerxes as one "Bessus, satrap of Bactria and Sogdiana under Darius III": "When Alexander pursued the Persian king [Darius III] on his flight to the East (summer 330), Bessus with some of the other conspirators deposed Darius and shortly after killed him.
10), with or without the prior agreement of Bessus, the satrap of Bactria, who had hoped to trade Darius, but found that Alexander was not minded to trade or take prisoners.
The low comedy scenes that are so often described as beneath contempt--like the ones in A King and No King where Bessus lets himself be kicked rather than fight--turn out in performance to inspire uncontrollable laughter from a roomful of otherwise humane and politically correct PhD candidates.