beta cell

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beta cell

[′bād·ə ‚sel]
(histology)
Any of the basophilic chromophiles in the anterior lobe of the adenohypophysis.
One of the cells of the islets of Langerhans which produce insulin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zhao (now Clinical Professor at Hackensack Medical University) further demonstrated the capacity of specific stem cells to differentiate into insulin secreting beta cells.
Even Melton's lab has shown various other ways to make insulin-secreting cells, including: stimulating growth of pancreatic beta cells (which improves glucose tolerance) by expression of betatrophin growth factor; direct reprogramming to turn other pancreatic cells into new insulin-secreting cells within the body; and regeneration of insulin-secreting beta cells by the normal pancreas, achieved by stopping the autoimmune attack typical of Type 1 diabetes.
The study first examined how mice in which almost all beta cells were destroyed-similar to humans with type 1 diabetes-responded to injections of caerulein.
We are excited to continue our collaboration with ViaCyte and believe beta cell encapsulation therapy may one day virtually eliminate the daily management burden for those living with T1D.
In his latest study, Zaghouani used Ig-GAD2 and then injected adult stem cells from bone marrow into the pancreas in the hope that the stem cells would evolve into beta cells.
This may be accomplished by beta cell gene therapy or by drugs that interfere with this pathway in order to maintain normal beta cell function.
Normally, according to Hussain, when we ingest glucose, the pancreatic beta cells release an initial burst of insulin almost immediately, then gradually release more insulin about 15 minutes later.
Amylin This hormone is stored and secreted with insulin in the beta cells of the pancreas.
The work, funded by the Health Research Board and the Mater Foundation, also showed that even in type 1 diabetics, the body continues to try and produce beta cells.
Diabetes, glucose toxicity, and oxidative stress: a case of double jeopardy for the pancreatic islet beta cell.
Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, results when the immune system destroys beta cells in the pancreas.
In type 1 diabetes, the immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.