betaine

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betaine

[′bēd·ə‚ēn]
(organic chemistry)
C5H11O2N An alkaloid; very soluble in water, soluble in ethyl alcohol and methanol; the hydrochloride is used as a source of hydrogen chloride and in medicine. Also known as lycine; oxyneurine.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interest in the medical use of betaine [2(N,N,N-trimethyl-ammonium) acetate] has been generated by the knowledge of its importance as an alternative homocysteine methylating agent.
Here, we report a simple and sensitive isocratic HPLC-UV method for the determination of DMG and betaine in plasma and urine.
They provide superior flash foam and foam quality over betaines while maintaining a preservative-free profile.
These patented blends of lactylates, glucosides, sarcosinates and betaines are custom-formulated and designed to mimic the foam performance of the sulfated surfactants for flash and foam stability, explained Beio.
In general, betaines are known to possess multifunctional properties in personal care hair and skin cleansing products including: viscosity building, foam volume enhancement, foam stability, improved skin and eye mildness and skin feel.
Cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) has been extensively used as a secondary surfactant in personal care applications.
Polymers like cellulose ethers (hydroxypropyl methykellulose, for example) can also be used as foam stabilizers although they may not be as economical as amine oxides and betaines, will take longer to process and will not add to the foam volume in any considerable quantity.
Based on coconut, it can be formulated into a broader pH (2-13) range than other betaines, and has applications wherever the formulator wants foam.
Aristonate[R] oil-soluble sulfonates, Aristonic[R] Acids, Calamide[R] amides, CalBlend[R] performance blends, Calfax[R] diphenyl oxide disulfonates, Calfoam[R] alcohol]ether sulfates, Calimulse[R] sulfonates and sulfates, Calsoft[R] sulfonates, Calsuds[R] detergent concentrates, Caltaine[R] betaines and Pilot[R] specialties and hydrotropes.