synagogue

(redirected from Beth knesset)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

synagogue

(sĭn`əgŏg) [Gr.,=assembly], in Judaism, a place of assembly for worship, education, and communal affairs. The origins of the institution are unclear. One tradition dates it to the Babylonian exile of the 6th cent. B.C. The returnees may have brought back with them the basic structure that was to be developed by the 1st cent. A.D. into a well-defined institution around which Jewish religious, intellectual, and communal life was to be centered from this earliest period into the present. Other scholars believe the synagogue arose after the Hasmonean revolt (167–164 B.C.) as a Pharisaic alternative to the Temple cult. The destruction of the Temple (A.D. 70) and the Diaspora over the following centuries increased the synagogue's importance. Services in the synagogue were conducted in a simpler manner than in the Temple. There was no officially appointed priest, the services being conducted by a chazan (reader). The role the synagogue played in preserving Judaism intact through the centuries cannot be overestimated, nor can its influence as an intellectual and cultural force. In the modern period, the reform movement restricted its scope to almost purely religious purposes, although among the Orthodox Jews its purview did not diminish. In more recent times the synagogue has again taken on its former functions as a social and communal center. The architectural appearance of the synagogue has usually not differed from that of local non-Jewish forms. The interior includes an ark in which the Torah scrolls are held and a platform from which they are read. In modern times, a pulpit from which to preach has also become common, and in many synagogues the three are combined on one platform. In the United States, the national synagogue associations, the Union of Orthodox Jewish Congregations, the United Synagogue of America (Conservative), and the Union of American Hebrew Congregations (Reform) are organized in the Synagogue Council of America.

Bibliography

See U. Kaploun, ed., The Synagogue (1973); A. Eisenberg, The Synagogue through the Ages (1974); C. H. Krinsky, Synagogues of Europe (1987).

Synagogue

A place of assembly, or a building for Jewish worship and religious instruction.

Synagogue

 

in Judaism, a community of believers and a house of worship. Synagogues originated in Palestine in the fourth century B.C. and in Egypt in the third century B.C. After the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem by the Romans in A.D. 70 and the expansion of the Diaspora, synagogues were established wherever Jews lived. The first synagogues were instrumental in the growth of monotheism.

Religious services take place in the synagogue, and the Bible and Talmud are read and discussed. In the Middle Ages, deviation from the dogmas of Judaism resulted in excommunication from the synagogue. Both Uriel Acosta and Spinoza were excommunicated.

The architecture of synagogues varies greatly. The common features are a rectangular shape, three or five aisles, an ark of the law at the eastern wall in which the scrolls of the Torah are kept and, in front of the ark, a raised platform for the reading of sacred texts.

REFERENCE

Wischnitzer, R. The Architecture of the European Synagogue. Philadelphia, Pa., 1964.

synagogue

A place of assembly for Jewish worship.

synagogue

1. 
a. a building for Jewish religious services and usually also for religious instruction
b. (as modifier): synagogue services
2. a congregation of Jews who assemble for worship or religious study
3. the religion of Judaism as organized in such congregations
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoffman said he took the position at Congregation Beth Knesset Bamidbar because it is very hard to find an opening for a rabbi anywhere in California.
Colvin said the rabbi spot at Congregation Beth Knesset Bamidbar opened up after the last rabbi decided to move to a larger congregation in Glendale.
For Beth Knesset members, the cost is $18 for adults, $15 for seniors age 62 and older, and $12 for children ages 5 through 13.
LANCASTER - Beth Knesset Bamidbar, the Reform Jewish Congregation of the Antelope Valley, will celebrate the holiday of Purim at 7 p.
Performers will include Lindsey Jordan, the YMCA Kids, Marisa Silva, the Extensions Dancers under the direction of Lara Arnaiz, Sean Unruh, children from Beth Knesset Bamidbar, Jaymee Bishop, Sarah Mestas, Jacob Nelson, and Santa's helpers Brianna Ketterling and Kaitlin Foster.
today at Beth Knesset Bamidbar will honor the millions who died.
She said the chapter makes annual Holocaust awards to Antelope Valley High School students, donates money for Passover Seders to the needy, assists patients at convalescent hospitals with games and gives them toiletries, donates food to the Palmdale SAVES food bank, presents trees to Bar and Bat Mitzvah children and works with Temple Beth Knesset Bamidbar and Chabad to identify Jewish holidays for school events.