Beth-shemesh

Beth-shemesh

(bĕth-shē`mĕsh), in the Bible. 1 The Egyptian Heliopolis. 2 Town of ancient Palestine, the modern Tel Bet Shemesh (Israel), W of Jerusalem. Excavations there have revealed traces of the Egyptian occupation in the 2d millennium B. C. It also appears as Ir-shemesh. 3 Town of Issachar. 4 Unidentified town of Naphtali.
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By applying contemporary trauma theory, especially the methodologies for processing post-traumatic-stress-disorder and even more particularly the process of abreaction, to the conversion narratives contained in John Roger's Othel or Beth-shemesh (1653), McAreavey illustrates how "what is distinctive about the trauma literature produced by the Independent communities of the 1650s is that ultimately the 'whole' that is formed at the end of the abreaction process is not constituted by the self but by the godly community of which one becomes a member" (164).
Jerusalem functioned as the capital not only for the rural and pastoral population, (57) but also for cities in Judah, such as Beth-Shemesh Stratum 3, Arad Strata XII-XI, Lachish Levels V-IV, and Beersheba Stratum VII-V, (58) as well as for Gezer, Megiddo, and Hazor in Israel.
Bunimovitz and Lederman, "Jerusalem and Beth-Shemesh," 43-45.
Robinson and Smith had noted that near ancient Beth-shemesh there was a Wadi Isma'in (a segment of Nahal Soreq), and the local fellahin admitted that it was named for Isma'il = Ishmael.
Beth-shemesh is distinguished by the almost complete absence of pig bones while Ekron has them in abundance.
shows that Timnah (WNW of Beth-shemesh in the Sorek Valley, Josh.
The cows went straight in thc direction of Beth-shemesh along one highway, lowing as they went; they turned neither to the right nor to the left, and the lords of the Philistines went after them as far as the border of Beth-shemesh.
demonstrates that there was a recognized border between the fields belonging to Beth-shemesh and those of the Philistines to the west.
The non-Israelites, who were subjected to mas obed, lived in lowland areas such as the coastal plains and the Valley of Jezreel (a notable exception was Beth-shemesh and Beth-anath in Upper Galilee, Judg.