Bethulia


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Bethulia

(bēthyo͞o`lēə), city, ancient Palestine, apparently located somewhere NE of Samaria, c.10 mi (16.1 km) from that city. It was the scene of the principal events of the Book of Judith. It has been variously identified, by some even with Jerusalem.
References in classic literature ?
Before Felton replied, and before she should be forced to resume this conversation, so difficult to be sustained in the same exalted tone, she let her hands fall; and as if the weakness of the woman overpowered the enthusiasm of the inspired fanatic, she said: "But no, it is not for me to be the Judith to deliver Bethulia from this Holofernes.
Naturally, the Bible was big business as well with the legendary D W Griffiths' Judith of Bethulia steaming up great-great grandad's glasses as the heroine Judith offered her virtue to the commander besieging her city, a plot to knock him off.
I mentioned that I knew Blanche Sweet, who had played the title role back in 1913 in Judith of Bethulia.
Violence and war in the story of Judith are undoubtedly gendered, for though they are suffered by all Jews in the city of Bethulia, it is metonymically represented by a woman's body, Judith or "Jewess.
He provides critical studies of The Goddess, Stagecoach, Death in Venice, Vertigo, North by Northwest, Judith of Bethulia, and Bringing up Baby; analysis of filmmakers Billy Wilder, Alfred Hitchcock, Eric Rohmer, D.
Immediately before her departure from Bethulia for Holophernes' camp, Cambris describes her handiwork that includes the "histoires excellentes" of Lot, Suzannah, Joseph, Jephte (4.
As God miraculously saved Jericho (2 Kings 19) and kept Bethulia from extreme need (Judges 7), Magdeburg could trust that "God has not removed his hand from us.
In the Return of Judith to Bethulia in the Uffizi of c.
2 (1991):Judith sive Bethulia liberata; Petite pastorale, Eglogue de bergers; Canticum pro pace; Domine salvum, prieres pour le roi.
If Protestant partisans during the Wars of Religion could use Judith's triumph over Holofernes to represent the triumph of reformed religion over the Papacy, so too could their Catholic counterparts use the heroic widow of Bethulia to signify the defeat of heresy by the "true" church.
Observing that the men of her mythical village of Bethulia are immobilized by fear, Judith conceives and carries out a plot to decapitate Holofernes, leader of Nebuchadnezzar's Assyrian army.