Betty Friedan


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Betty Friedan
Bettye Naomi Goldstein
Birthday
BirthplacePeoria, Illinois, United States
Died
NationalityUnited States of America
Known for Reshaping the attitudes of Americans toward the lives and rights of women.

Friedan, Betty (Naomi Goldstein)

(1921–  ) author, feminist leader; born in Peoria, Ill. A summa cum laude graduate from Smith (1942), she was awarded fellowships for working toward a doctorate in psychology but abandoned this under the influence of what she would later call "the feminine mystique." She married in 1947 and for almost the next 20 years lived the life of a conventional suburban housewife/mother. (She had three children; she would get divorced in 1969.) As a result of surveys of female college graduates, she came to identify certain problems that women were experiencing in their lives, and after several years of research she published The Feminine Mystique (1963), an exposé of the traditional roles assigned to women in modern industrial societies; although not an especially profound critique, it became an international best-seller and is credited with generating the so-called second wave of modern feminism. In 1966 she was one of the founders of the National Organization for Women (NOW) and served as its first president (1966–70), moving on to other activities promoting the advancement of women. Through her writings, lecturing, organizational work, and outspokenness, she became one of the most influential feminist leaders of the late 20th century. In 1982, feeling that some individuals and elements of the feminist movement had gone off into extreme positions, she published The Second Stage, calling for a more balanced approach in the women's movement, and in 1993 she published The Fountain of Age, about the ways that older people can find satisfaction in their lives.
References in periodicals archive ?
Daniel Horowitz, Betty Friedan and the Making of the Feminine Mystique (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999).
Betty Friedan, The Feminine Mystique (New York: Norton, 1963), 81-101.
Prominence: One of the most important women in the second wave of the women s liberation movement, Betty Friedan, died recently.
When Betty Friedan published her groundbreaking book, "The Feminine Mystique," in 1963, most women were homemakers, teachers and nurses, not pilots, physicists and doctors.
Betty Friedan, author of The Feminine Mystique, died on her 85th birthday on Saturday (4 February) at her place of residence in Washington DC, US, due to congestive heart failure.
Social commentator and author Angela Neustatter says: ``In the 50s, Betty Friedan, an American at the forefront of the women's rights movement, did extensive research which found that women who worked very hard at keeping up appearances were also swallowing Valium by the bucketload.
Social commentator and author Angela Neustatter says: "In the 50s, Betty Friedan, an American at the forefront of the women's rights movement, did extensive research which found that women who worked very hard at keeping up appearances were also swallowing Valium by the bucketload.
Women's rights are brought to life by Lisa Federiksen Bohannon in Woman's Work: The Story Of Betty Friedan (1931798419): this biography of Betty Friedan shows how a radical reporter turned housewife and mother, then launched a revolution contradicting common perceptions about women and their abilities.
Barbara Jordan, Cesar Chavez, Malcolm X, Harvey Milk, Anita Hill, Sister Souljah, Betty Friedan, Colin Powell, Jesse Jackson, Louis Farrakhan, Barney Frank, Kweisi Mfume, and Hillary Rodham Clinton.
Those who would dispute this recent dating of the revolution, recall such grandmother pioneers as Betty Friedan or Simone de Beauvoir.
Born this day Betty Friedan, 82, feminist; Alice Cooper, 55; singer/songwriter; Chastity Bono, 34, daughter of Sonny and Cher; Natalie Imbruglia, 28, pop singer, pictured and Echo readers Laura Louise Green, 18, David Jenkins, 18, and Michelle Russ, 29.