Beveridge Report


Also found in: Financial.

Beveridge Report

a report setting out the principles which informed the creation of the British WELFARE STATE immediately after World War II. The formal title of the report is Social Insurance and Allied Services (published in 1942), but it is more commonly known after its author, William Beveridge (1879-1963).

Influenced by a KEYNESIAN ECONOMIC model which promoted full employment, and following the interwar economic depressions, Beveridge wanted to create a social policy which would eradicate what he considered to be the five great problems of idleness, ignorance, disease, squalor and want. The report advocated the introduction of social insurance to provide a universal system of social security (including family allowances) and a universal, comprehensive and free NATIONAL HEALTH SERVICE. Although the Beveridge Report gained wide support, it has been criticized for establishing a meagre system of benefits and for reinforcing a wife's economic dependence on her husband since, according to the scheme, in the case of a married couple, only the man could claim. See also POVERTY.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Beveridge report would still be gathering dust, it not for the Labour Government enacting it in 1948.
The Beveridge Report, published in November 1942, proposed widespread reforms to the system of social welfare to address what he described as the five "Giant Evils in society": squalor, ignorance, want, idleness and disease.
The Tax Credits Act, passed in July 2002, was hailed as the biggest reform since the Beveridge Report and aimed to make a difference to the working poor.
Two others actually had copies of The Beveridge Report, which recommended a safety net of national insurance handed down by their fathers.
It is so much contrary to the spirit after the war influenced as it was by the Beveridge report.
In 1925 The Beveridge Report recommended a widows, orphans and old age contribution pension for manual and low wage workers.
It was an important, nation-defining moment when following the Beveridge Report, the Attlee government brought in, for the first time in the 1940s, a comprehensive national insurance system.
The Beveridge report of 1942 paid due attention to New Zealand.
De manera particular, en noviembre de 1942, mientras Europa era estremecida por la guerra de Hitler, que dirigia un regimen que destruia en los campos de concentracion la naturaleza humana bajo los preceptos del racismo y la ideologia nazi, se presentaba ante el Parlamento britanico el Social Insurance and Allied Services, conocido como Beveridge Report.
14 In politics, in which decade was the Beveridge Report, which led to the establishment of the Welfare State, released: the 1940s, 1950s or 1960s?
The conclusion underlines this point, connecting the 1942 Beveridge Report, which provided the framework for Britain's postwar welfare state, with its wartime context--essentially arguing the welfare state as the logical companion of the emerging "civil defense" state (318).
Since the Beveridge report was implemented, it has gone frosupplying basic benefits to people to help them in times of need to supplying them payments for every conceivable perceived need that crops up.