Bhairava


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Bhairava

(m), Bhairav (f) terrible forms of Shiva and spouse. [Hindu Myth.: Parrinder, 44]
See: Horror
References in periodicals archive ?
In this self-imposed mission he learns of a cold-blooded mass murderer Bhairava (SJ Surya) who's planning to create more mayhem.
The dog is also associated with the Bhairava form of the Hindu God Shiva.
Tenders are invited for Sr (Plan) To Bala Bhairava At Kamakhya Hill.
The author has organized the main body of his text in six chapters devoted to image, imagination, and meaning, image and visualization in classical Hinduism, imagining the body in Tantric rituals, materializing space and time in Tantric images, the transformative role of imagination in visualizing the image of Bhairava, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
Under martial rule and under the watchful eyes of marshals all our legislators should be subjected to Surya namaskar for fifteen minutes before the day's session to put some sense into them and be taught the right way of practising a few meditation mudras like anjali mudra (prayer seal), dyani mudra, (empty bowl seal) bhairava mudra (doble hand bowl seal), chinmaya mudra (thumb-finger curl seal) and adi mudra (fist seal) etc.
Fie brings a remarkable 12th-century sandstone carving of Bhairava from Rajasthan or Uttar Pradesh.
subsidiary shrines for Shiva and Bhairava, both excellent examples of
Asi las cosas, respecto al plano supremo, el plano de Bhairava, ?
It references all body shapes, from the pot- bellied Ganesha to the deformed Kuber, from the snake goddess Nagadeva to Bhairava, who roams around cremation grounds," says Ahuja, who had only two years to design and conceptualise this show.
Bhairava removes the bondage of the one who worships this deity (CVS 8).
Another counter example is provided by the eight Bhairava gods or Astabhairavas, who in the Indian zodiac of the Siva Rock Temple at Tiruchirappalli happen to occupy the positions of the intermediate directions (see Mollien 1853; Kirfel 1959:56).
Entering the exhibition, the viewer is first visually engaged with a mask of Bhairava (sixteenth century), a fierce form of the Hindu god Siva, from the Nepal Connection (Fig.