biceps

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Related to Biceps brachii muscle: Brachialis muscle

biceps

(bī`sĕps), any muscle having two heads, or fixed ends of attachment, notably the biceps brachii at the front of the upper arm and the biceps femoris in the thigh. Originating in the shoulder area, the heads of the biceps merge partway down the arm to form a rounded mass of tissue linked by a tendon to the radius, the smaller of the two forearm bones. When the biceps contracts, the tendon is pulled toward the heads, thus bending the arm at the elbow. For this reason the biceps is called a flexor. It works in coordination with the tricepstriceps,
any muscle having three heads, or points of attachment, but especially the triceps brachii at the back of the upper arm. One head originates on the shoulder blade and two on the upper-arm bone, or humerus.
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 brachii, an extensor. The biceps also controls rotation of the forearm to a palm-up position, as in turning a doorknob. The size and solidity of the contracted biceps are a traditional measure of physical strength.

Biceps

 

a muscle that begins with two heads. The arm biceps in man originates at the shoulder blade and is attached to the tuberosity of the radius; it flexes the arm at the elbow joint and raises it at the shoulder joint. The biceps of the thigh originates at the ischial tuberosity and the thigh bone, and it is attached to the tibia in the region of the head of the fibula; it extends the thigh and flexes the shin.

biceps

[′bī‚seps]
(anatomy)
A bicipital muscle.
The large muscle of the front of the upper arm that flexes the forearm; biceps brachii.
The thigh muscle that flexes the knee joint and extends the hip joint; biceps femoris.

biceps

Anatomy any muscle having two heads or origins, esp the muscle that flexes the forearm
References in periodicals archive ?
To determine the maximal voltage level required for each subject's biceps brachii muscle, the 50-[micro]s pulse duration was selected and an incremental increase in voltage applied to the muscle.
Noninvasive interrogation techniques of the biceps brachii muscle during cycle ergometry suggest that "resting" muscles, such as those of the arms and shoulder girdle, may contribute to the V[O.
The shoulder hyperextension, elicited by the IDC protocol, stretches the long head of biceps brachii muscle beyond its optimal length, leading to an inefficient actin-myosin coupling.
The triceps scapularis and biceps brachii muscles were transected and evaluated for viability based on hemorrhage on incision.
Acoustic and electrical activities during voluntary isometric contractions of biceps brachii muscles in patients with spastic cerebral palsy.