equivalence

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equivalence

[i′kwiv·ə·ləns]
(mapping)
In an equal-area map projection, the property of having the ratio between areas on the map the same as the ratio between corresponding areas on the earth's surface.
(mathematics)
A logic operator having the property that if P, Q, R, etc., are statements, then the equivalence of P, Q, R, etc., is true if and only if all statements are true or all statements are false.
References in periodicals archive ?
at 2595 (noting that a biconditional may be constitutionally impermissible "regardless of whether the government ultimately succeeds in pressuring someone into forfeiting a constitutional right").
Obviously, Attridge and Inglis (2013) interpreted this fact as evidence that, without learning mathematics, people understand conditional as biconditional and, after doing that, they adopt the defective interpretation.
The aim of this experiment was to test, again, the two novel predictions in Experiment 1 by using conditional and biconditional problems:
The theory or idea that T has a feature which is interpretable on T but unvalued on T itself is based on Pesetsky and Torrego's (2004b/2007) rejection of Chomsky's (2000, 2001) biconditional.
Truth-conditions, in standard semantics, are associated with the biconditionals, like S is true iff P, where P expresses the content of S.
Conversational Comprehension Processes are Responsible for Reasoning Fallacies in Children as well as Adults: If is not the Biconditional, 19 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOL.
This fact makes it possible for an interpreter to identify, with no knowledge of the meanings of the agent's sentences, all of the pure sentential connectives, such as negation, conjunction and the biconditional.
Recall that, for Hegel, the dialectical motor that pushes developmental becomings by its fits and starts begins with a biconditional determination between Being and Nothing (which thereby accumulates qualitative detail, granting determinate and concrete qualities to otherwise empty empirical things that are indicated in rather barren terms by mere demonstratives in language).
There is an exactly analogous distinction between a meta-linguistic biconditional in a theory or definition of truth, like "Snow is white' is true-in-English iff 'is white' applies in English to the English designatum of 'snow", and those special theorems called 'T'-sentences that appropriately fix the nonsemantic truth conditions.
The third experiment aimed at testing a prediction derived from mental models theory: a biconditional formulation of the additional premise should result in more suppression than the conditional formulation.
This proposition expresses a species relative biconditional that can be read as follows: For some species [S.