hydralazine

(redirected from Bidil)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

hydralazine

[hī′dral·ə‚zēn]
(pharmacology)
C8H8N4 An antihypertensive drug; used as the hydrochloride salt.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Kahn suggests, the approval of BiDil ushered in a new era for Big Pharma: what is known today as pharmacogenomics, or "personalized medicine.
While other commentators have disagreed with the negative characterization of the BiDil trials, (14) there seems little doubt that different perspectives on the strength of the research exist in the academic literature.
BiDil is contraindicated in patients who are allergic to organic nitrates.
In 2005, the FDA approved the first "race drug," called BiDil.
HEART OF THE MATTER BiDil is a combination of two drugs that have had a roller coaster history in heart failure therapy.
Second, given that the BiDil researchers admit that their drug will work in non-African Americans, the most plausible reason for conducting a race-specific clinical trial is that NitroMed holds the rights to a race-specific patent that will give them control over profits from BiDil until 2020 if it is approved by the FDA.
In this population, BiDil is indicated as an adjunct to current standard therapies such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers.
34) Indeed, the BiDil experience demonstrates how commercial forces can help to create a message that the press then transmits to the public.
Denial of access to BiDil, and required switching of patients from brand drugs to generics that are not as effective, are a healthcare disparity of the greatest sort, he said.
More drugs like BiDil may be coming, but "I don't think this is where we want to go," he said.
In clinical trials, BiDil reduced deaths by 43% and decreased hospitalization by 39% among African American heart failure patients.
NitroMed of Lexington, Massachusetts is the maker of BiDil (isosorbide dinitrate/hydralazine hydrochloride), an orally administered medicine available in the United States for the treatment of heart failure in self-identified black patients.