Bidpai

Bidpai

or

Bidpay

(both: bĭd`pī), supposed name of the author of the fables of the PanchatantraPanchatantra
[Sanskrit,=five treatises], anonymous collection of animal fables in Sanskrit literature, probably compiled before A.D. 500 (see Bidpai). The work, derived from Buddhistic sources, was intended as a manual for the instruction of sons of the royalty.
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. The name first appears in an Arabic version of these fables—hence they are called the fables of Bidpai. The word is probably Sanskrit, meaning "wise man" or "court scholar."
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Adapted from the writings of the 10th Century philosophers, Ikhwan al-Safa, the writing emulates the famous Sanskrit Tales of Bidpai , ( Kalila wa Dimna ), and anticipates Attar's Conference of the Birds by at least one hundred years.
networks as extensive as the Life of Ahiqar, the Fables of Bidpai, or
Calila e Dimna tambien conocida como Fabulas de Bidpai o Ejemplario contra los enganos y peligros del mundo, traducido en 1251 por ordenes del Infante Alfonso, a quien un ano mas tarde le asentarian la corona real, es una coleccion de fabulas orientales recogida de distintas fuentes sanscritas en el siglo VI por Barzuyeh.
Next, in an essay that appeals for both its subject matter and its intriguing thesis at the intersection of literature, visuality, and memory, Donald Beecher traces the medieval and Renaissance reception of the Indian Fables of Bidpai.
Perhaps the most intriguing of the literary essays was Donald Beecher's discussion of the Bidpai fables, a group of texts originally from the Sanskrit that entered Europe (in Latin) toward the end of the thirteenth century.
One of Keith-Falconer's most important academic achievements was his translation in 1882 of the Syriac Kalilah and Dminah: The Fables of Bidpai (subsequently published in 1885).
The Moral Philosophy of Doni, popularly known as The Fables of Bidpai.
There are five German folktales (Grimm, 1977); five Irish tales; two French tales (both attributed to Perrault, but one is actually by Madame Le Prince de Beaumont); two "Slavic" tales; two Indian stories (from the Bidpai and Mahabharata); two episodes from the Aeneid; and one Czech, one Japanese, and one Swedish tale.
Kalila and Dimna or The Fables of Bidpai is one of the literary gems of world culture, having been translated through the centuries everywhere from China to Spain.