bifurcation ratio

bifurcation ratio

[bī·fər′kā·shən ‚rā·shō]
(hydrology)
The ratio of number of stream segments of one order to the number of the next higher order.
References in periodicals archive ?
Important areal, linear and relief parameters were computed such as perimeter, basin area, basin length, drainage density (Dd), stream frequency (Fs), elongation ratios (Re), bifurcation ratio (Rb), circulatory ratio (Rc) etc.
The relation between stream length ratio and bifurcation ratio confirms geological, geomorphological and hydrogeological nature of the research area.
The bifurcation ratio is a ratio of the number of streams (Nu) in the specified order to the very next higher order (Nu + 1) number of streams.
In order to evaluate the hazard probability of the different basins, some of the morphometric parameters were used these morphometric parameters include drainage density, drainage frequency and bifurcation ratio.
The overall hazard degree which determined by comparing the hazard degree resulted from bifurcation ratio versus drainage frequency and bifurcation ratio versus drainage density (Table 3) indicate that one basin high possibility for flash floods and Three basins have moderate possibility of flash floods and two basins have low possibility of flash floods.
Wadi, A = area, L = length, W = width, P = perimeter, TL = total length, TDN = total drainage number, Rb = Bifurcation ratios, D = Drainage density Table 3.
The bifurcation ratio is the slope of the line formed by a semilog plot of stream number to stream order.
2) An average bifurcation ratio can be obtained by averaging the individual ratios between each stream order.
Average value of bifurcation ratio shows that development of the basin was independent of structural control.
In addition to this, linear aspects of morphometry such as stream order (Nu), bifurcation ratio (Rb) and stream length (Lu) were calculated following the work of Horton [5], Strahler [6] and Chorley [23].
Bifurcation ratio expresses the ratio of the number of stream segments of lower order to the number of stream segments of higher order" [26and27].