Big Bend Ranch State Park


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Big Bend Ranch State Park,

Texas: see under Big Bend National ParkBig Bend National Park,
801,163 acres (324,471 hectares), W Tex.; authorized 1935, est. 1944. It is a triangle formed where the Rio Grande runs southeast then northeast in a big bend along the U.S.-Mexico border, notably through deep canyons such as the Santa Elena.
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Big Bend Ranch State Park


Location:Western portion of the state, along the Rio Grande from southeast of Presidio to near Lajitas.
Facilities:Primitive campsites, group camps, picnic areas, OHV trails, hiking trails, bridle trails, bike trails, bike rentals.
Activities:Camping, fishing, rafting, canoeing, swimming, hiking, biking, backpacking, OHV riding, interpretive programs.
Special Features:Embracing some of the most remote and rugged terrain in the Southwest, the park encompasses two mountain ranges containing ancient extinct volcanoes, precipitous canyons, and waterfalls. The park is home to a tremendous diversity of animal and plant species, including 14 species of bats, several species of hummingbirds, and at least 11 other rare plants and animals, including Hinckley oaks and mountain lions. The park also maintains a small herd of Texas longhorn cattle, a remnant of the property's ranching heritage.
Address:PO Box 2319
Presidio, TX 79845

Phone:432-229-3416
Web: www.tpwd.state.tx.us/spdest/findadest/parks/big_bend_ranch/
Size: 299,008 acres.

See other parks in Texas.
References in periodicals archive ?
When sexes were pooled, Big Bend National Park had the lowest annual rate of mortality caused by trapping, followed by Carlsbad Caverns and Guadalupe Mountains national parks and Big Bend Ranch State Park (Table 2).
Trapping was the sole source of mortality at Big Bend Ranch State Park and a significantly greater source of mortality than shooting and unknown ([[chi square].
Harveson (1997) reported an overall rate of survival of 81% for males, almost 30% higher than those in Big Bend, Carlsbad Caverns, and Guadalupe Mountains national parks, and Big Bend Ranch State Park.
This timing coincides with the appearance of the species along the northern reaches of Big Bend Ranch State Park and the Dalquest Research Site.
We gratefully acknowledge the following colleagues who have shared their knowledge and observations (or lack thereof) of feral burros in Texas: Big Bend Ranch State Park superintendent Louis Armendirez; Texas Parks & Wildlife biologists Billy Tarrant for Presidio County and Mike Sullins for Brewster County, Mike Haiduk of Lamar University; Loren Ammerman of Angelo State University, and David Schmidly of Oklahoma State University.
Big Bend Ranch State Park had the second largest amount of escape terrain (324 [km.
Area and perimeter-to-area ratios of escape terrain located at Big Bend National Park (BBNP), Big Bend Ranch State Park (BBRSP), Black Gap Wildlife Management Area (BGWMA), and Guadalupe Mountains National Park (GMNP) in Texas.
Specimens were collected from the Big Bend Ranch State Park in accordance with scientific collecting permits issued by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (permit numbers SPR-0790-189 and 4-94).
The individual (TTU 68598, TK 48160), a pregnant female (4 embryos, crown-rump length 9 mm), was acquired on 5 August 1995 from a locality in Big Bend Ranch State Park (UTM coordinates 13 601619E 3260741N).
Mammals were collected in Big Bend Ranch State Park in accordance with scientific collecting permits issued by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (permit numbers SPR-189, 25-95).
As a reference point for these UTM coordinates, Big Bend Ranch State Park Headquarters (Sauceda Ranch), which has UTM coordinates 13 601203E, 3260197N, is situated approximately 9 km S, 41 km E of Presidio.
fulvescens were obtained from three locations in Presidio County, and a single specimen from one site in western Brewster County, all within the boundaries of the Big Bend Ranch State Park.