Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge


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Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge

Address:1661 W JPG Niblo Rd
Madison, IN 47250

Phone:812-273-0783
Fax:812-273-0786
Web: www.fws.gov/midwest/bigoaks
Established: 2000.
Location:5 miles north of Madison on US Highway 421.
Facilities:Interpretive exhibits, wildlife viewing sites, boat ramp.
Activities:Boating, fishing, hunting, wild food products (mushrooms, nuts, berries, asparagus) may be gathered for personal use, educational programs (by prior arrangement).
Special Features:Refuge contains at least 32 caves, all of which are closed to the public. During a recent survey of the caves and wells on the refuge, researchers discovered 6 previously unknown species of invertebrates.
Habitats: 50,000 acres of grasslands, shrub, forests, and wetlands; 165-acre lake.
Access: Open 10 days per month from mid-April until the end of November; contact refuge office for specific days and times.
Wild life: River otter. Also a broad range of birds (200 species sighted), mammals (39 species), bats, reptiles and amphibians, fish, and butterflies.

See other parks in Indiana.
References in periodicals archive ?
We conducted our study in the 20,234-ha Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge (39[degrees] 03' N, 85[degrees] 25' W) in Jefferson, Jennings, and Ripley counties, Indiana.
Some form of nest concealment was found at all nests of Cerulean Warblers at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
We thank Joseph Robb for permission to work at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge and his staff for field support.
Vegetative characteristics at Cerulean Warbler territories and random sites at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, Indiana during 2002 and 2003.
No studies have been conducted to quantify the grassland communities at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
Army military site, formerly known as Jefferson Proving Ground, was re-dedicated as Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge (Big Oaks NWR).
The primary function of the use of fire as a management tool at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge is to maintain the grassland habitats by reducing the density of woody vegetation (USFWS 2001).
Maintaining these unique midwestern grasslands is vital to maintain the unique biodiversity at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
Stand table for overstory trees sampled during the summer of 2001 at Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
Fish and Wildlife Service has developed draft management plans for the proposed Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge.
Public open houses to discuss management and public use options for the proposed Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge are scheduled for the following dates and locations: