Bigger Thomas


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Related to Bigger Thomas: Native Son

Bigger Thomas

possesses a pathological hatred of white people. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Hatred

Bigger Thomas

finds freedom through killing and life’s meaning through death. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Irony
References in periodicals archive ?
It appears merely to be Wright's recollection of their philosophical debates over their different perceptions of Bigger Thomas.
This comment speaks to the ways in which every "physiological and psychological reaction" of Bigger Thomas is "an unconscious protest" against what Max insists on calling "our society" (367).
Wright mentioned Ted Ward as a possible choice for Bigger Thomas.
4) Second, I will base my analysis of the two main characters, Bigger Thomas and Okonkwo, upon the preceding background discussion, as well as upon the comparative perspective of three psychological concepts used as motifs in the structure of the narratives.
Ouchi and Suzuki read Wright's work as the literature of fear: Native Son focuses on the tragic plight of an individual, Bigger Thomas, who tries to transcend his fear through understanding, as do the young Wright in Black Boy, Cross Damon, and Fishbelly Tucker.
So young Americans like Bigger Thomas wear guns to hide their fear and respond with anger in response to anyone who disrespects them.
This moment of gothic cathexis has its corollary in "Book One: Fear" of Wright's Native Son as Bigger Thomas stealthily tries to deliver Mary Dalton, who has passed out from drugs and alcohol to her bedroom without being discovered.
Amazingly, so does the story of his greatest creation, Bigger Thomas, possess universality.
A survey of outstanding physical similarities between the fictional account of Bigger Thomas and the actual story of Loeb and Leopold clearly establishes Wright's intentional use of this infamous case in the writing of Native Son.
As his subtitle indicates, Butler's Bigger Thomas is ultimately a very positive figure, not simply "the principal male character in a novel" as my outdated and gender-biased old American Heritage Dictionary defines "hero," but quite possibly as the dictionary further states, "Any man noted for feats of courage or nobility of purpose.
13) In the Autobiography and in Lee's film, Sophia extends the work of the figure of the wealthy young white woman in Richard Wright's Native Son and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, in which Bigger Thomas and the Invisible Man, respectively, consciously look the image of an obsequious darkie so that they can do anything they want.
Dalton offers Bigger Thomas a job as the family chauffeur in Native Son, he is a guilt-driven hypocrite who has profiteered off the squalid tenement in which Bigger's family lives.