Bigger Thomas


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Related to Bigger Thomas: Native Son

Bigger Thomas

possesses a pathological hatred of white people. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Hatred

Bigger Thomas

finds freedom through killing and life’s meaning through death. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
See: Irony
References in periodicals archive ?
lt;/pre> <p>Such a world of "conflict and action" reduces men to "drunkards" who live on "animal sensation alone," avoiding "the dull flat look of things"; it produces not only individuals such as Bigger Thomas, Richard Loeb, and Nathan Leopold but also the cataclysmic disruptions of "Nazi Germany and old Russia" (446).
Glicksberg "is speaking hyperbolically" when he claims that "Richard Wright is Bigger Thomas--one part of him anyway," but adds "Nevertheless, there is some truth in the assertion, and not merely in the general sense, according to the formulation of James Baldwin, that 'no American Negro exists who does not have his private Bigger Thomas living in the skull.
In a nightmare version of Dixon's worst fears, Bigger Thomas experiences a revelation of his power as a direct consequence of passing through the threshold of Mary's bedroom.
For that matter, the mystery of the Daltons is not solved when the skeleton in th eir basement is revealed, leading eventually to Bigger Thomas, because it is clear that they will never understand the secret behind the veil of the black belt where people live in houses the Daltons own.
Ralph Ellison is heard as soulful blues, Bigger Thomas is heard as "mood and angry sounds," and the Marxist vision of Richard Wright is silenced.
After a few days, little Thomas was now slightly bigger Thomas and we were told to leave the ward, despite my argument that if everyone is prospering under medical supervision, why rush things?
She turns a critical eye to what she calls "the (socio)ontological-epistemological setup" vis-a-vis the creation of Richard Wright's fictional character, Bigger Thomas.
I]f there had been one person in the Dalton household who viewed Bigger Thomas as a human being, the crime would have been solved in half an hour.
Became a double wide king sized nigger Named Bigger Thomas shaking the
In this setting, Bigger Thomas represents the would-be artist whose arrested development demonstrates the collaborating social impact of personal privacy, self-obliteration, and the creation of fictional narratives or fields, a trio of experiences the reader-as-author simulates via his or her configuration of Bigger as a fictional character.
Rather, his focus is on the "Native Son effect--really the Bigger Thomas effect," which "stimulated an enormous growth in consciousness in American audiences and publishers" (125).
When I read Richard Wright's Native Son, I was fascinated by that incident when Bigger Thomas suffocated Mary Dalton to death, brutally severed her head with a hatchet and threw her body into a blazing furnace.