Bonny

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Bonny

(bŏn`ē), town, SE Nigeria, in the Niger River delta, on the Bight of Biafra. In the 18th and 19th cent., Bonny was the center of a powerful trading state, and in the 19th cent. it became the leading site for slave exportation in W Africa. From 1885 to 1894 it was the administrative center of the British Oil Rivers Protectorate. Bonny declined in the 20th cent. but revived after 1961, when its port was modernized as the export point for petroleum refined at Port HarcourtPort Harcourt
, city (1991 est. pop. 362,000), SE Nigeria, a deepwater port on the Bonny River in the Niger delta. It is an industrial and commercial center where steel and aluminum products, pressed concrete, glass, tires, paint, footwear, furniture, and cigarettes are
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Bonny

Bight of. a wide bay at the E end of the Gulf of Guinea off the coasts of Nigeria and Cameroon
References in periodicals archive ?
They were points of departure for millions, but the millions more who departed from West Central Africa or the Bight of Biafra had a very different experience.
The Slave Trade and Culture in the Bight ofBiafra dissects and explains the structure, dramatic expansion, and manifold effects of enslavement trade in the Bight of Biafra.
The asiento trade provides the best evidence for this point as a disproportionate number of Africans from the Bight of Biafra and West-central Africa were re-exported to Spanish colonies.
The majority of Nigerian immigrants in Equatorial Guinea were from southeastern Nigeria, and, in addition to a few who willingly made their way to Bioko, many of them were smuggled across the waters in the Bight of Biafra (National Archives, Calabar CADIST 13/1/414).
The Colonial Office had decided to move the court of the Mixed Commission, which adjudicated on whether or not ships were involved in illegal slave trading, from Freetown to the island of Fernando Po, in the Bight of Biafra (see Freetown and Fernando Po).
His first break was the death of Davis in a skirmish in the Bight of Biafra.
Topics include revolution and emancipation in Saint Domingue; French abolitionism; the relationship between capitalism and slavery; British evangelicals, economic warfare, and the abolition of the slave trade, shipping patterns and mortality in the African slave trade to Rio de Janeiro; fluctuations in sex and age ratios in the slave trade from 1663 to 1864; slave resistance and white reaction in the British Windward Islands; British parliamentary politics and the abolition of slavery, French anti-slavery and the revolutions of 1848, Brazilian abolition and the contraband slave trade to Brazil; the control of land and labor in the British West Indies following abolition; and the compatibility of the slave and palm oil trades in the Bight of Biafra (also called the Bight of Bonny).
Similar developments took place in Senegambia, Upper Guinea, Central Sudan, and the Bight of Biafra where people from diverse ethnic backgrounds converted into pan-regional religions--Islam of the Arochukwu (Ibini Okpabi) and Ekpe religious societies.