aid

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aid

1. Mountaineering any of various devices such as piton or nut when used as a direct help in the ascent
2. (in medieval Europe; in England after 1066) a feudal payment made to the king or any lord by his vassals, usually on certain occasions such as the marriage of a daughter or the knighting of an eldest son

AID

References in periodicals archive ?
Environmental aid is increasingly allocated through bilateral aid agencies rather than through the multilateral channels created for this purpose.
There is a powerful case for maintaining the UK's bilateral aid to Pakistan," the Committee conceded.
In contrast, Moon has said that, if elected, he would resume bilateral aid cut off by South Korea's outgoing leader, President Lee Myung-bak, and offer new talks without preconditions.
It is, on the face of it, surprising that India, one of the world's fastest growing economies, should be the largest recipient of bilateral aid from the UK.
Next we examine whether the influence of loans on aid changes when we replace the dependent variable log total aid per capita with log bilateral aid per capita.
The reserves have been built up on the back of home remittances sent by overseas, exports, IMF stand by credits and multilateral and bilateral aid inflows.
But Moscow has generally resisted pleas for bilateral aid, instead supporting steps to beef up the lending power of the IMF in return for a greater say in how the global lender of last resort is run.
It said the practice of giving around 15% of the UK's bilateral aid budget - pounds 643m in 2010/11 - direct to recipient governments through so-called "budget support operations" had been "effective", though its practical value varies from country to country.
They found that the donor interest model fits bilateral aid, while the recipient need model explains multilateral flow.
Earlier this year, the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) published Development for Results, a 70-page summary of the agency's activities plus a synopsis of what it is doing in the 20 "countries of focus" selected for receipt of CIDA bilateral aid.
Bilateral aid to the two countries was also promised.
Bilateral aid is given by one country directly to another; multilateral aid is given through the intermediacy of an international organisation, such as the World Bank, which pools donations from several countries' governments and then distributes them to the recipients.

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