bile acid

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bile acid

[′bīl ′as·əd]
(biochemistry)
Any of the liver-produced steroid acids, such as taurocholic acid and glycocholic acid, that appear in the bile as sodium salts.
References in periodicals archive ?
cerevisiae has integral ATP-binding membrane proteins (ABC proteins), responsible for the translocation of bile salts and may efficiently transport conjugated bile acids.
Some intestinal diseases, such as Crohn's disease, can damage the part of the small bowel where bile salts are reabsorbed, predisposing patients to gallstones.
Genetic analysis of two bile salt hydrolase activities in Lactobacillus acidophilus NCFM.
When the squamous cells were exposed in culture to acidic bile salts, the cells ramped up their production of several proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-8 and interleukin-lb.
It is clear that cholesterol overload in the liver aggravates the organ injury decompensating GSH system, which could be related to a rapid cell death, particularly by apoptosis, potentiated by the overproduction of bile salts that eventually conducts to organ failure and animal death.
It occurs due to insufficient mixing of chyme with bile salts and enzymes of gastrointestinal tract (pancreatic and intestinal disorders) e.
Bile formation by hepatocytes involves the active transport of bile salts, phospholipids, cholesterol, and other organic solutes from the sinusoidal blood into the biliary canaliculi, which is mediated by various active transporters.
Michael Gerber, MD, HMD, lists several treatments for addressing gallbladder stress and insufficient bile, including bile salts, herbs, neural therapy, homeopathy, acupuncture, and liver/gallbladder flush.
5] Because cholesterol is the precursor for the synthesis of bile acids, bile salts, and sterols, this study was conducted to investigate the effect of 6%, 12%, and 18% water-soluble gummy fibers on biliary and fecal bile acids and sterols in normal and diabetic rats fed on high-cholesterol diet.
2012), or excreted in the bile as free cholesterol or bile salts following conversion to bile acids in the liver, which was catalyzed by the rate-limiting cholesterol 7[alpha]-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) (Chen et al.