Bilhah


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Bilhah

(bĭl`hə), in the Bible. 1 Rachel's maid and Jacob's concubine. 2 City of Simeon, of unknown location. It also appears as Baalah and Balah.
References in periodicals archive ?
When Rachel's slave girl Bilhah bore a child Rachel proclaimed "God has done me justice" (Gen 30:5).
Maharsha (Shmuel Eidels, 1555-1631) explains that Reuben's transgression was that he didn't realize that Jacob had actually freed Bilhah from her slavery.
Genesis 30:1-43, where Bilhah conceived and bore a child for Rachel.
It offers us 1) chapters on warnings about sexual misbehavior; a list of wrongdoing by the Watchers; Ham and Noah; Abraham, Sarai, and Pharaoh; circumcision; and the sin of Lot/destruction of Sodom; 2) chapters on the problems of intermarriage and rape: Dinah, Reuben, and Bilhah, Joseph and Potiphar's wife, Noah and his progeny, Abraham and his progeny, Isaac and Jacob and their progeny, and an essay on the language of sexual misbehavior; and 3) chapters on such questions as creation and marriage, Abraham and Sarah, Rebecca and Isaac, and Jacob, Leah, and Rachel.
Bilhah had been Rachel's handmaiden, whom Jacob had taken as his concubine, upon Rachel's request, in view of Rachel's difficulty in conceiving (Genesis 30:1-4).
Bilhah Rubinstein similarly relates four of Bashevis's works to their Kabbalistic source material and examines their narrative structure.
Like others who have read The Red Tent, I can't wait to talk to her about her vivid portrait of the Biblical women who, in her telling, made up the heart and soul of Jacob's prosperous clan: Dinah, Jacob's only daughter by Leah; Leah herself; Rachel, her rival for Jacob's affections; and their sister-handmaidens, Zilpah and Bilhah.
Two generations later, barren Rachel frantically offers her maid Bilhah to Jacob for sexual intercourse so that "I (Rachel) will be built ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) through her" (Gen 30:3).
Your mother" refers to Leah (or perhaps to Leah, Bilhah and Zilpah, all of whom are Joseph's stepmothers)--the other mother figure(s) in Joseph's life.
Women of the lower status (Hagar, Bilhah, Zilpah) are exploited for the sake of higher-class women, which is really for the sake of patriarchy.
Rachel bore Jacob no children, so she gave him her slave-girl Bilhah, who bore him sons.
Rachel said to her husband Jacob, "Behold my maid, Bilhah, go in unto her, and that she may bear upon my knees, and I also obtain children by her.