binary tree

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binary tree

[′bīn·ə·rē ′trē]
(mathematics)
A rooted tree in which each vertex has a maximum of two successors.

binary tree

(btree) A tree in which each node has at most two successors or child nodes. In Haskell this could be represented as

data BTree a = NilTree | Node a (BTree a) (BTree a)

See also balanced tree.

binary tree

A data structure in which each node contains one parent and no more than two children.


Binary Tree
References in periodicals archive ?
The 27 regular papers discuss such topics as heuristics for determining the elimination ordering in the influence diagram evaluation with binary trees, combining constraint types from public data in aerial image segmentation, and towards a machine learning algorithm for predicting truck compressor failures using logged vehicle data.
We recursively define a binary tree by being either an empty tree or a pair of binary trees (resp.
We consider finite full binary trees in which every node has zero or two children.
Unlike CART, which generates only binary trees, a node can have here a variable number of branches.
The book does not cover templates, exception handling, the Standard Template Library, RTTI, writing manipulators, binary trees, and object-oriented programming concepts.
The first test was based on standard questions and dealt with the following topics: basic definitions, Euler path, Hamilton path, order of functions, Breadth First Search (BFS), Dijksta algorithm, binary trees, and binary search trees.
In addition, complete binary trees have a number of important properties.
Binary trees are used when all the data is in random-access memory (RAM).
maketree: Given a 3-uple (actually is a pair) whose first component is a natural number n, and whose second and third components are binary trees [b.
For instance, balanced binary trees are used for the ordered collections.
5 shows four of the 14 binary trees with four nodes.
The relationship of the Catalan numbers to various concepts is then presented in examples dealing with partial orders, total orders, topological sorting, graph theory, rooted-ordered binary trees, pattern avoidance, and the Narayana numbers.