carrier protein

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Related to Binding protein: Retinol binding protein, Androgen binding protein, GTP binding protein, TATA box binding protein, CREB binding protein, fatty acid binding protein

carrier protein

[′kar·ē·ər ‚prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A membrane protein that transports a specific solute across the cell membrane by binding to the solute on one side of the membrane and then releasing it on the other.
References in periodicals archive ?
Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and their role in controlling IGF actions.
Annexins-unique membrane binding proteins with diverse functions.
Turnover of the plasma binding protein for vitamin D and its metabolites in normal human subjects.
Unlike steroid receptors, which allow hormones to turn on genes in the nucleus of a cell, these binding proteins trigger hormone action at the surface of cells, Danzo explains.
Calcium Binding Proteins" will be launched with a January issue to focus on the structure and function of calcium binding proteins and their association with calcium.
Another explanation for the difference observed between EP and DES exposure in peak luciferase activity could be that EP is initially bound to binding proteins in the serum and uptake by the embryonal target tissues is therefore slower compared with DES, which has much lower affinity to binding proteins (Arnold et al.
Cytosolic Calcium Binding Proteins Lacking EF-Hands.
The proposed research aims to tackle this problem by binding proteins to large 3D scaffolds made of DNA origami.
The hypothetical model included genes that produce three alcohol dehydrogenases, a cytochrome P450 enzyme, retinoic acid binding proteins and receptors, and four nuclear proteins.
Some chapters cover non-specific interactions using peptides, inhibitors, and antibodies as the affinity ligand while others focus on specific groups of molecules: oligosaccharides and glycosylated proteins, nucleotide-binding proteins, proteins binding free and chelated metal ions, and DNA binding proteins.
Focus will also be on growth factor action in the prostate, including growth factors, binding proteins, receptors, and signal transduction pathways.
Also described are methods for determining if an animal is at risk for atherosclerosis, methods for evaluating an agent for use in treating atherosclerosis, methods for treating atherosclerosis, and methods for treating a cell having an abnormality in structure or metabolism of low density lipoprotein binding proteins.