Binocular Vision


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Binocular Vision

 

vision with two eyes. In binocular vision, the visual axes of the eyes are arranged in such a manner that the images of the object viewed strike the identical portions of the retinas of both eyes. This produces a single stereoscopic image—a view of the world in relief. Binocular vision also makes it possible to determine visually the relative location of objects in space and to judge their distance from each other. When looking with one eye—that is, with monocular vision—the distance of objects can likewise be judged, but not as accurately as with binocular vision.

References in periodicals archive ?
If binocular vision matures before onset of deviation, binocular functions will be better.
Binocular vision and ocular motility: George von Noorden: Classification of neuromuscular anomalies: chapter 8.
2002), but it is unknown whether binocular vision is needed to be effective in the performance of a more complex skill, involving a whole body rotation, like the handspring on vault.
Patients with divergent squints most commonly present between the ages of 1 and 4 years; the condition nearly always remains intermittent and is therefore associated with good binocular vision.
Binocular vision allows animals to see three-dimensional objects more clearly, even when the objects are motionless or camouflaged.
The other three products are unibody laser rangefinders with binocular vision capability.
Surgery when patients are as young as 3 or 4 months of age can provide binocular vision.
We center ourselves with the threat, because a creature with binocular vision instinctively wants to get more visual input and this maximizes the field of view.
Binocular vision requires that the vergence angle between the two visual axes be adjusted for proper fusion of the two retinal images so that the point of regard is projected onto the fovea of each eye (i.
Binocular vision problems occur when both eyes do not work in a co- ordinated way.
He has binocular vision and "likes symmetry" and sway.
The famous procede of Raymond Roussel, with its deformation of first line to last ("Les lettres du blanc sur les bandes du vieux billard" [letters of the alphabet in white chalk on the billiard table] becoming, for instance, "les lettres du blanc sur les bandes du vieux pillard" [letters posted by a white man concerning the hordes of the old plunderer]), finally engenders not binocular vision, as its creator probably intended, but instead an ongoing double vision.