biodiversity

(redirected from Bio-diversity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

biodiversity:

see biological diversitybiological diversity
or biodiversity,
the number of species in a given habitat. Scientists have variously estimated that there are from 3 to 30 million extant species, of which 2.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Biodiversity

The variety of all living things; a contraction of biological diversity. Biodiversity can be measured on many biological levels ranging from genetic diversity within a species to the variety of ecosystems on Earth, but the term most commonly refers to the number of different species in a defined area.

Numbers of extant species for selected taxonomic groups
Number of Estimated number Percent
Kingdom Phylum species described of species described
Protista 100,000 250,000 40.0
Fungi Eumycota 80,000 1,500,000 5.3
Plantae Bryophyta 14,000 30,000 46.7
Tracheophyta 250,000 500,000 50.0
Animalia Nematoda 20,000 1,000,000 2.0
Arthropoda 1,250,000 20,000,000 5.0
Mollusca 100,000 200,000 50.0
Chordata 40,000 50,000 80.0
*With permission, modified from G. K. Meffe and C. R. Carroll, Principles of Conservation Biology, 1997.

Recent estimates of the total number of species range from 7 to 20 million, of which only about 1.75 million species have been scientifically described. The best-studied groups include plants and vertebrates (phylum Chordata), whereas poorly described groups include fungi, nematodes, and arthropods (see table). Species that live in the ocean and in soils remain poorly known. For most groups of species, there is a gradient of increasing diversity from the Poles to the Equator, and the vast majority of species are concentrated in the tropical and subtropical regions.

Human activities, such as direct harvesting of species, introduction of alien species, habitat destruction, and various forms of habitat degradation (including environmental pollution), have caused dramatic losses of biodiversity; current extinction rates are estimated to be 100–1000 times higher than prehuman extinction rates.

Some measure of biodiversity is responsible for providing essential functions and services that directly improve human life. For example, many medicines, clothing fibers, and industrial products and the vast majority of foods are derived from naturally occurring species. In addition, species are the key working parts of natural ecosystems. They are responsible for maintenance of the gaseous composition of the atmosphere, regulation of the global climate, generation and maintenance of soils, recycling of nutrients and waste products, and biological control of pest species. Ecosystems surely would not function if all species were lost, although it is unclear just how many species are necessary for an ecosystem to function properly.

Biodiversity

The tendency in ecosystems, when undisturbed, to have a great variety of species forming a complex web of interactions. Human population pressure and resource consumption tend to reduce biodiversity dangerously; diverse communities are less subject to catastrophic disruption.

biodiversity

[‚bī·ō·di′vər·sə·dē]
(ecology)
The range of living organisms (such as plant and animal species) in an environment during a specific time period.

biodiversity

the existence of a wide variety of plant and animal species in their natural environments, which is the aim of conservationists concerned about the indiscriminate destruction of rainforests and other habitats
www.biosis.org.uk/zrdocs/zoolinfo/biodiv.htm
www.eti.uva.nl
www.biodiv.org
References in periodicals archive ?
It may be noted that the doubling of agricultural food production worldwide during the past 35 years can be largely attributed to use of nitrogen fertilizers but it has had negative impact on bio-diversity, soil fertility and ozone layer.
A bit of creative quarrying on these farms with wider support could only help bio-diversity.
We have exhausted our surplus wood inventories in the Spanish Forest, while newly created parks and protected areas along with forestry guidelines that maintain bio-diversity have reduced harvest levels," he says.
Instead, they emphasize the specific dimensions that affect their communities--the struggle against corporate crime and pollution; the vulnerability of small-scale farmers and artisans from protectionist policies of northern countries; and the danger posed by multilateral agreements, such as the Convention on Bio-Diversity, to the preservation of traditional knowledge systems and habitats.
Worm traces his interest in hot spots to work begun in the 1980s highlighting bio-diversity centers on land.
Farmers taking part provide an overview of their operation including rotation cycles, reasons for organic growing or conversion, the benefits of bio-diversity and how they encourage it on their farm.
Members of the group said the mining project could endanger the unique bio-diversity of the area as well as the delicate coral reefs and fishing grounds, source of food for the Kanaks.
Ecologists have developed several quantitative measures for assessing the bio-diversity of any habitat.
To our delight, our uneven-aged forest has become a showplace of bio-diversity for both forest professionals and forest landowners who are interested in managing forests for posterity.
I sincerely hope "Poetry in Motion" is an example of the magazine's newfound dedication and commitment to sustainable economic growth issues, which are synonymous with the preservation and management of our planet's rapidly dwindling bio-diversity and fresh air and water supplies.
Over 800 vibrant photographs and informative, lively text make each topic come alive, whether it's bio-diversity, oceans or eco-tourism.
It was a catalyst,'' Juanita Freel said of the suit filed by the Southwestern Center for Bio-Diversity.