bioarcheology

(redirected from Bioarchaeology)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

bioarcheology

[¦bī·ō‚är·kē′äl·ə·jē]
(archeology)
A discipline in which the concepts of human biology are integrated with anthropological archeology.
References in periodicals archive ?
But isn't Tell Zeidan in Syria -- an archaeological site where she carried out a human bioarchaeology project funded by the University of Chicago -- just five kilometres from Raqqa, the de facto capital of the ISIS 'caliphate'?
It encompasses a variety of relevant bioanthropological topics including human evolution, paleodemography, bioarchaeology, and paleopathology.
The partnership will contribute new research avenues to the field of bioarchaeology, protect the remains through careful and respectful excavation, analysis, and re-interment, and increase public understanding of Canadas heritage through archaeological research.
Amsterdam: Institute for Geo- and Bioarchaeology, Vrije Universiteit.
Though, curiously, there is no overt indication of it elsewhere in the book, the introductory chapter by Jesse Byock and Davide Zori indicates that the chapters are organised into five sections: I: Archaeology and History; II: Bioarchaeology, Human Health and Diet; III: Artefacts; IV: Environmental Archaeology; and V: Travel, Trade and Communication.
The Routledge Handbook of the Bioarchaeology of Human Conflict
Rebecca Redfern, from the Center for Human Bioarchaeology has revealed that at least one of the skulls shows evidence of being chewed at by dogs, which implies that it was still fleshed when it was left to decompose in the open pit, Discovery News reported.
Dr Jo Appleby, lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, said: "Despite Richard's noble background, it appears his lifestyle did not completely protect him from intestinal parasite infection, which would have been very common at the time.
Jo Appleby, Lecturer in Human Bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, said: "Despite Richard's noble background, it appears that his lifestyle did not completely protect him from intestinal parasite infection, which would have been very common at the time.