bioarcheology

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bioarcheology

[¦bī·ō‚är·kē′äl·ə·jē]
(archeology)
A discipline in which the concepts of human biology are integrated with anthropological archeology.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Routledge handbook of the bioarchaeology of human conflict, xlvi+706 pages, numerous b&w illustrations, numerous tables.
Notification of the Bioarchaeology at the Office of the State Archaeologist and the State Historic Preservation Office when the work will be scheduled to be conducted.
Rebecca Redfern, from the Center for Human Bioarchaeology has revealed that at least one of the skulls shows evidence of being chewed at by dogs, which implies that it was still fleshed when it was left to decompose in the open pit, Discovery News reported.
Dr Jo Appleby, lecturer in human bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, said: "Despite Richard's noble background, it appears his lifestyle did not completely protect him from intestinal parasite infection, which would have been very common at the time.
Jo Appleby, Lecturer in Human Bioarchaeology at the University of Leicester, said: "Despite Richard's noble background, it appears that his lifestyle did not completely protect him from intestinal parasite infection, which would have been very common at the time.
A KING REVEALED: King Richard III's skeleton as it was found in Leicester''s Greyfriars car park, below right, and, left, Jo Appleby, a lecturer in Human Bioarchaeology, at the University of Leicester, who led the exhumation
Jo Appleby, a lecturer in human bioarchaeology, at University of Leicester, School of Archaeology and Ancient History, who led the exhumation of remains at Greyfriars car park, speaking at the university, after tests revealed they are of King Richard III
Bioarchaeology of the African Diaspora has increased understandings of slave health.
Dr Jacqui Mulville, senior lecturer in bioarchaeology at Cardiff University, said: "Talking to people at festivals is a great way to ensure a wide coverage and a greater range of audiences for our work.
Santana said that funeral sites help learn bioarchaeology and study the people lived at that time, adding that the 2010 archeological expedition found human remnants, warehouses and stores that help identify the impact of economic and social changes in the transition from fishery to an agrarian community.
Her topics include bone biology and human osteology, reconstructing activity patterns health and disease, trauma, cultural modifications, diet, biological relationships, and the future of bioarchaeology.
The talks, by members of Durham University's Human Bioarchaeology Research Group, will explore topics relating to the study of human remains from archaeological sites.