Biogenic Amines


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Biogenic Amines

 

proteinogenic amines, a group of nitrogen-containing organic compounds that form in human, animal, plant, and bacterial organisms through the decarboxylation (splitting off of the COOH group) of amino acids. Many biogenic amines—histamine, serotonin, noradrenaline, adrenaline, tyramine, and others—are biologically active substances that affect processes of inhibition and excitation in the cerebral cortex and the subcortical centers and evoke changes in blood pressure—by means of vasodilation or vasoconstriction—and other bodily changes. Many biogenic amines that are formed in the large intestine in man and animals by the action of putrefactive bacteria are toxic. Biogenic amines are biologically inactivated primarily by means of oxidative deamination (splitting off of the amino group), which is catalyzed by a group of enzymes—the amine oxidases. Adenosine phosphoric acids, nucleic acids, and high-molecular-weight carbohydrates such as heparin play an important role in the binding of biogenic amines by biochemical cell components. Biogenic amines present in cells in a bound state are inactive and are not affected by amine oxidases.

I. S. SEVERINA

References in periodicals archive ?
Biogenic amine concentration (mM) at 48 h during in vitro rumen fermentation using different ratios of soybean meal and soluble starch Amines Soybean meal:soluble starch ratio Control 10:0 7:3 Histamine 0.
No corresponding phenomena have been reported for other biogenic amines.
Paleologos EK, Savvaidis IN and MG Komtominas Biogenic amine formation and its relation to microbiological sensory attributes in ice-stored whole gutted and filleted Mediterranean Sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax).
Neurochemistry and defects of biogenic amine neurotransmitter metabolism.
Effects of toluene inhalation on brain biogenic amines in the rat.
These make patients sensitive to biogenic amines in foods, such as some mature cheeses; fermented foods, e.
Biogenic amines (BA) are generally formed through the decarboxylation of specific free amino acids by exogenous decarboxylases released by microbial species associated with fermented food and beverages.
MARKET LEADERS WITH THEIR PRODUCTS IN BIOGENIC AMINES 51
Decarboxylation of amino acids to give biogenic amines occurs through the activity of amino acid decarboxylases, which are either naturally found in the food tissue, or are produced in the food by bacteria [28].
They revise the principal strategies for characterizing red wines by using compositional profiles of biogenic amines as a source of information, and emphasizing toxicological and organoleptic repercussions associated with the presence of these natural components.
Among the studied amines there were several so-called biogenic amines, which are products of the degradation of organic matter and may be a cause of allergenic reactions [21-23].