microscopy

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microscopy

1. the study, design, and manufacture of microscopes
2. investigation by use of a microscope

microscopy

[mī′kräs·kə·pē]
(optics)
The interpretive application of microscope magnification to the study of materials that cannot be properly seen by the unaided eye.

microscopy

The use of microscopes to view ultra-small objects. Optical microscopes use a light source from below or to the side of the object being magnified. For example, in the medical field, there are numerous optical techniques, many of which require altering the samples being observed.

Scanning electron microscopes are able to magnify objects smaller than .2 micrometers, which is smaller than the wavelength of light. Scanning probe microscopes can image down to the molecular level (see AFM and STM).
References in periodicals archive ?
Address correspondence to the author at: Department of Photobiology and Bioimaging, The Scintillon Institute, 6404 Nancy Ridge Dr.
In an effort to advance research relevant to the mission of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) which includes basic biomedical, clinical biomedical, bioengineering, bioimaging, and behavioral research, the participating Institutes and Centers solicit applications for the Mentored Quantitative Research Career Development Award (K25).
The State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo Center of Excellence in Bioinformatics (BCEB) merges high-end technology, including super-computing and visualization, with expertise in genomics, proteomics, and bioimaging, to enable major contributions in science and healthcare.
The grant from the National Institute of Bioimaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) of the U.
Technological innovations, such as bioimaging, bioinformatics and medical applications, would receive $88 million in funding, while genetic research would receive $21 million for SNIP analysis for healthcare applications.
The result will be a person qualified in "computational bioimaging.
Bioimaging of metals and proteomic studies of clinical samples by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS)
The second half more specifically explores applications of precious metals including dental, therapeutic, tissue engineering, and bioimaging.
Nanotechnology and bioimaging expert prof Loo noted that the new biomarker can also release anti-cancer drugs by creating a layer of coating loaded with drugs on the outside of the nanoparticle.
Topics presented include the use of nano and micro-particles as probes and sensors in biological tissue, quantum dots as bioimaging and diagnostic tools, interactions of organic molecules with nanoscale tools, real-time clinical monitoring of biomolecules, and measurement techniques applicable to biological systems such as infrared light probes, biomolecule separation techniques, spectroscopy, and radiation and nuclear magnetic resonance probes.
The properties of these new C-dots make them ideal for a variety of bioimaging applications and for medical diagnostics.