Biolocation

Biolocation

 

(from bio ... and the Latin loco “I place,” “I set”), the ability of an animal to determine its position in space (bio-orientation) or the position of an object in relation to itself (direction, distance). Biolocation is achieved by the perception of external signals by the body’s surface or by special sense organs (vision, touch, smell, hearing, balance, and others). A distinction is made between direct (passive) biolocation, which is characteristic of most animals, and echolocation, by which is perceived the reflection of an acoustic, mechanical, electrical, or other signal sent into space by an animal and reflected by some object. The latter is characteristic of cetaceans (for example, dolphins), bats, and some other mammals.

N. P. NAUMOV

References in periodicals archive ?
All measurements are done by the method of biolocation.
However, the scientific community ignores the fact that for almost 2,000 years, the biolocation method has been used to find water and various metals without the knowledge of the physics of the phenomenon.
As a result of study of various minerals, it became possible to find out the following minerals, the radiation of which has been fixed by a method of biolocation.
All these measurements are made by the method of biolocation involving two operators in 12 measurements (four sets of three measurements).
The error in determining the wavelength here is sufficiently high, about 10-20%, but it is necessary to take into account that the measurement is conducted by the biolocation method.
is different from a sinusoidal form) that the aerial strengthens (amplifies) one of the harmonics of radiation, and this is fixed with the help of biolocation.