biological magnification

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Related to Biomagnification: bioaccumulation

biological magnification

[‚bī·ə¦läj·ə·kəl ‚mag·nə·fə′kā·shən]
(ecology)
The increasing concentration of toxins from pesticides, herbicides, and various types of waste in living organisms that accompanies cycling of nutrients through the trophic levels of food webs.
References in periodicals archive ?
methylmercury bioaccumulation and biomagnification in food webs, see id.
carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus) * Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of chemicals (e.
2001) Relationship between chromium biomagnification ratio, accumulation factor and mycorrhizae in plants growing on tannery effluent polluted soil.
35) Bioaccumulation and biomagnification of pesticides can also cause serious health problems for nonresidents if they regularly consume fish from the contaminated area.
By feeding on terrestrial spiders, birds can functionally increase the length of their food chains and increase biomagnification of mercury from aquatic macroinvertebrates to terrestrial birds (Cristol et al.
The substance accumulates in the tissues of fish, and as larger fish eat smaller ones, bioaccumulation and biomagnification concentrate the methylmercury up the food chain.
Total Mercury Distribution and Importance of the Biomagnification Process in Rivers of the Bolivian Amazon.
Application of geoscience techniques and expertise contributes to understanding the sources and pathways of natural versus anthropogenic contaminants; bioaccumulation and biomagnification of contaminants in remote settings; and regional variability in background levels of elements and their compounds in the environment.
a]cknowledging that the Arctic ecosystems and indigenous communities are particularly at risk because of the biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants.
The range of issues covered is perhaps demonstrated by citing some specific examples of entry topics: collective agriculture, aquaculture, farmland conservation, agrodiversity and seeds, elephants, Endangered Species Act, Dian Fossey, genetics and genetic engineering, mad cow disease, whales and whaling, biomagnification, Human Genome Project, volatile organic compounds, butterfly effect, ocean currents, community forestry, cultural ecology, wind energy, continental shelf, Grand Canyon, Charles Darwin, Ralph Nader, postcolonialism, Earth First
Metal content and bioavailability influence plant metabolism and in turn, the entire ecosystem due to trophic relations and the process of bioaccumulation and biomagnification.