Biome

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Biome

A major community of plants and animals having similar life forms or morphological features and existing under similar environmental conditions. The biome, which may be used at the scale of entire continents, is the largest useful biological community unit. In Europe the equivalent term for biome is major life zone, and throughout the world, if only plants are considered, the term used is formation. See Ecological communities

Each biome may contain several different types of ecosystems. For example, the grassland biome may contain the dense tallgrass prairie with deep, rich soil, while the desert grassland has a sparse plant canopy and a thin soil. However, both ecosystems have grasses as the predominant plant life form, grazers as the principal animals, and a climate with at least one dry season. Additionally, each biome may contain several successional stages. A forest successional sequence may include grass dominants at an early stage, but some forest animals may require the grass stage for their habitat, and all successional stages constitute the climax forest biome. See Desert, Ecological succession, Ecosystem, Grassland ecosystem

Distributions of animals are more difficult to map than those of plants. The life form of vegetation reflects major features of the climate and determines the structural nature of habitats for animals. Therefore, the life form of vegetation provides a sound basis for ecologically classifying biological communities. Terrestrial biomes are usually identified by the dominant plant component, such as the temperate deciduous forest. Marine biomes are mostly named for physical features, for example, for marine upwelling, and for relative locations, such as littoral. Many biome classifications have been proposed, but a typical one might include several terrestrial biomes such as desert, tundra, grassland, savanna, coniferous forest, deciduous forest, and tropical forest. Aquatic biome examples are fresh-water lotic (streams and rivers), fresh-water lentic (lakes and ponds), and marine littoral, neritic, upwelling, coral reef, and pelagic. See Fresh-water ecosystem, Marine ecology, Plants, life forms of

Biome

An entire community of living organisms in a single major ecological area.

Biome

 

an aggregation of plant and animal species that make up the living population of a particular region. The term is used mainly in foreign ecological and biogeographic literature. The term “biota,” which is applied to wider areas of the earth’s surface, expresses a similar idea.

biome

[′bī‚ōm]
(ecology)
A complex biotic community covering a large geographic area and characterized by the distinctive life-forms of important climax species.
References in periodicals archive ?
A stroll around the steamy Rainforest Biome with its waterfalls, papaya trees and tropical birds makes for an exciting afternoon whatever the weather is doing outside.
The rainforest biome is a jungle that will spark the imagination of any youngster.
I loved the tropical bubble, but for the highlight for me was the Mediterranean Biome, a journey through the warm temperate regions of the world.
I don't think I would have such a fun time learning about the four biomes and their animals without your biofacts," wrote Julien Piltzer from Balboa Magnet School.
In this paper Muma attempted to identify the locality of collected, identified solifugids in terms of generally accepted biomes or smaller biotic areas.
One of the most interesting aspects of the snowfall was that it settled on the roof of the Humid Tropics Biome.
All you could hear from the front of the queue was 'whoa' and 'blimey' as folk got their first view of the biomes - giant domes scattered over this massive site.
Brazil's Atlantic Forest is one of the richest biomes on Earth, and one of the most intensively developed.
Based on geodesic designs, the insect-shaped biomes house thousands of plants from the most diverse vegetation habitats of the world.
Three of the biomes have been selected to demonstrate the interdependence between man and nature.
The clustering of all four Sonoran Desert HPS cases during the late winter and early spring and the two montane conifer cases during the late spring and summer, when the mean temperatures for both biomes are mild (12 [degrees] C - 21 [degrees] C), are the best examples of this trend.
For example, if the fifth graders in you area are supposed to understand biomes, include the camp's biome in the lessons.