Bioremediation

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bioremediation

[‚bī·ō·ri‚mē·dē′ā·shən]
(ecology)
The use of a biological process (via plants or microorganisms) to clean up a polluted environmental area (such as an oil spill).

Bioremediation

A process that uses biological agents, such as bacteria, fungi, or green plants, to remove or neutralize contaminants, as in polluted soil or water. Plants can be used to aerate polluted soil and stimulate microbial action. The cleanup of a contaminated site using biological methods, i.e., bacteria, fungi, and plants, is a form of bioremediation. Organisms are used to either break down contaminants in soil or water, or accumulate the contaminants in their tissue for disposal. Many bioremediation techniques are substantially less costly than traditional remediation methods using heat, chemical, or mechanical means.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book is for beginning and more advanced mycologists and anyone interested in growing mushrooms, including mycology activists, artists, teachers, permaculturists, homesteaders, grassroots bioremediators, herbalists, natural medicine practitioners, and those interested in fermenting and natural food or growing psychoactive fungi.
This is due largely to the ability of macroalgae to achieve high biomass and have a significant potential as nutrient bioremediators (Msuya and Neori, 2002; Tyler and McGlathery, 2006; Marinho-Soriano et al.
frondosa were found to be excellent environmental bioremediators of cadmium pollution (25), but has no known human chelation effect.