Bioswale


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Bioswale

A landscape element, often a planted strip along a street or parking lot, for the purpose of capturing surface water runoff and filtering out silt and pollution before the stormwater enters the drainage system or groundwater and retains and cleanses runoff from a site, roadway, or other source.
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Lump Sum Bidsfor: Erosion control and water pollution prevention, bioswale, temp erosion & sediment control plan, perm signing, traffic signal sys, temp traffic control, clean exist drain struct, SPCC plan.
Installing bioswale natural water drainage to retain storm water runoff and decrease flooding
builder Atlantic Funding & Real Estate will pay a $50,000 penalty for stormwater control rule violations at its Gateway Landing development, and invest nearly $70,000 in a bioswale to filter silt and pollution from the site's contaminated runoff into the Erie Canal.
These elements could include a green roof on an office building, a rain garden in a front yard, a bioswale in a parking lot, or a road with permeable pavement.
In addition to optimizing energy usage, the facility also features a 140,000 gallon rain water harvesting system for irrigation, while the uncollected rainwater will be directed to a bioswale.
Landscaping will be done at the two crossings, including seeding of bare ground and a bioswale near the tunnel.
INNOVATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN: In the spring of 2012 ChemTrack designed and built an Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation-approved bioswale system at the Delta Western gas station in Haines.
A small-scale pavilion and amphitheater located near the site's bioswale provide an alternate venue for children's summer programs and an opportunity for education on sustainability.
Outside the building, tile fields, weirs and a bioswale surrounding an outdoor quadrangle area keep water runoff from polluting a nearby river and overpowering the currently strained municipal storm water system.
Taking these conditions into account, CDOT decided to replace the remediated soil with open-graded aggregate, pave the surface with porous pavers, and install an adjacent bioswale (a concave landscaping feature that reduces the volume and rate of surface runoff and improves water quality).
Classmate Kay reports, "In garden class, we plant and pick produce, compost leaves, and we recently built a bioswale.
Inspired by the local bishops' 2000 pastoral letter on the Columbia River, parishioners applied for a grant from the city to help fund the bioswale, which cost approximately $25,000, says Kevin Gorman, a parishioner who worked on the project.