Bioswale

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Bioswale

A landscape element, often a planted strip along a street or parking lot, for the purpose of capturing surface water runoff and filtering out silt and pollution before the stormwater enters the drainage system or groundwater and retains and cleanses runoff from a site, roadway, or other source.
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Tree plantings and installation of three bioswales are planned to help relieve stormwater impacts and reduce the amount of nonpoint source pollution entering Cooper River.
Bioswales are great ideas for home gardens, as you'll see on page 50.
These include construction of a range of natural coastal defense like permanent dune systems, berms, bioswales, and other barriers along the south shore of Staten Island, Broad Channel, Canarsie, Battery Park, and Breezy Point.
Water is treated through a series of infiltration sumps, bioswales, management zones, and wetlands throughout the golf course.
In addition to the groundwater recharge project, Method is working to protect the water in the Great Lakes by installing bioswales in its manufacturing facility where storm water is captured and filtered back into the ground rather than burdening the city's storm water system.
To collect rainwater runoff from the developed properties, the city would build environmentally friendly bioswales, ponds and channels, Harding said.
Green roofs [left] and bioswales in parking lots [right] are elements of green infrastructure, which helps absorb stormwater pollution before it reaches waterways.
Sustainable methods, such as bioswales or rain gardens, allow rain to slowly filter down through the soil, cleaning itself as it replenishes the aquifer.
The goal, he stated, is to reduce runoff by up to 250 million gallons per year through methods such as permeable pavement, tree-planting and bioswales.
Up to 80 percent of the typical average rainfall will be diverted through a combination of bioswales, rain gardens, permeable pavements and storm water features.
Many campuses are now incorporating rainwater gardens, bioswales, permeable pavements, green roofs, and green walls when planning major facilities.
This means an array of projects--green roofs, bioswales along the streets, grassy alleys, porous pavement for parking lots and the streets themselves.