bird strike

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bird strike

An incident deemed to have occurred whenever a pilot reports a bird strike; aircraft maintenance personnel identify damage to an aircraft as having been caused by a bird strike; personnel on the ground report seeing an aircraft strike one or more birds; or bird remains, whether in whole or in part, are found on an airside pavement area or within 200 ft of a runway, unless another reason for the bird's death is identified.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the 2002-2003 Wildlife Hazard Assessment conducted for MAFB by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), the airfield environment accounts for at least 35% of reported bird strikes and 25% of damage costs (4).
One cousin had the task of throwing chicken carcasses - feathers, claws and all - into the blades of jet engines to test their reaction to bird strikes.
Since the Travis program began in 1998, the annual number of bird strikes has dropped 80 percent from 269 to 67 in 2000, saving the base an average of $900,000 per year in aircraft repairs.
Now air accident investigators are calling for major improvements at Heathrow - where the incident happened - to prevent a plane crash resulting from a bird strike.
You could fly Kennedy Airport every day of your life and the odds are that wouldn't happen," Dolbeer says, adding that Kennedy is one of the few airports to keep detailed records of bird strikes.
US FAA said yesterday it is withdrawing its proposal to keep information on bird strikes private and will "make its entire bird strike database available on a public website" Friday.
Bird strikes present problems in virtually every state, including Oregon.
Bird strikes are common at airports and in Italy there are on average 600 a year, but yesterday's was one of the most serious involving a civilian jet.
Bird strikes happen most often during take off or landing, or during low altitude flight.
She said military aircraft were affected more by bird strikes than passenger planes because of their size and the altitude at which they fly.
There were 1,299 bird strikes in the UK last year, 1,780 in 2006 and 1,650 in 2005.
However, whilst fog, wind and thunderstorms cause only limited danger to modern aircraft, resistance to the impact of bird strikes has still not been achieved.