birthmark

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birthmark,

pigmented maldevelopment of the skin that varies in size, either present at birth or developing later. Birthmarks may appear as moles (melanocytic nevi) that vary in color from light brown to blue, and are either flat or raised above the surface of the skin. They are usually benign, but do rarely develop into malignant melanoma, a form of skin cancerskin cancer,
malignant tumor of the skin. The most common types of skin cancer are basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. Rarer forms include mycosis fungoides (a type of lymphoma) and Kaposi's sarcoma.
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. The so-called port-wine stains and strawberry marks involve vascular tissue. The flat port-wine stains can be made lighter with the use of laser therapy. The strawberry marks generally disappear a few years after birth.

birthmark

[′bərth‚märk]
(medicine)
Any abnormal cellular or vascular benign nevus that is present at birth or that appears sometime later.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is characterized by a congenital facial birthmark and neurological abnormalities.
Francine Blei, MD, MBA, is Medical Director, Vascular Birthmarks Institute of New York, Mount Sinai Health Care System, New York, NY, USA.
The most important thing is not to rush at treatment because many birthmarks disappear spontaneously.
l The most common causes of disfigurements include a cleft lip, birthmark or craniofacial condition; physical injury, such as burns, accidents, car crash injuries, scarring or dog bites; or health conditions, including eczema, acne or vitiligo.
But she says she was reassured by doctors and nurses that it was simply a strawberry birthmark that was "nothing to worry about".
There are a number of different types of birthmarks of varying size, shapes and colours - some will fade while others are permanent.
Oliver Grumley was born with a birthmark on his face which just grew and grew.
The report, published in April's American Journal of Ophthalmology, stated researchers performed early vision tests in four infants with vascular birthmarks, or hemangiomas, on the upper or lower eyelids.
Birthmarks may shrink, fade, or grow with the child.
According to the organization's Web site, the Vascular Birthmark Foundation is the leading not-for-profit organization in the world for families affected by vascular birthmarks.
Sally had experience in treating birthmarks, and he referred his patient to her.
Pigmented birthmarks are caused by an overgrowth of the cells that create pigment in skin.