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Thermoelectric devices made of inorganic semiconductor materials such as bismuth telluride are already being used today in certain technological applications.
Headquartered in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing, sales and distribution facilities worldwide, the company produces numerous crystalline compounds including zinc selenide for infrared laser optics, silicon carbide for high-power electronic sand microwave applications, and bismuth telluride for thermoelectric coolers.
Materials are typically either conductors or insulators, but topological insulators such as bismuth telluride are exotic hybrids: They block electric current in their interiors yet allow electrons to flow along their surfaces.
Commonly used thermal harvesters for power generation consist of p-and n-doped Bismuth telluride owing to its superior thermal properties.
The typical construction of a thermoelectric module is an array of N- and P-type bismuth telluride pellets on hot and cold side ceramic substrates.
Researchers from UCLA's Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science and from the materials division of Australia's University of Queensland show the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are "tunable" - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.
The commercially available, best, and simple compound thermoelectric material for refrigeration around room temperature is bismuth telluride ([Bi.
A number of thermoelectric materials have been developed for various operating temperature ranges: bismuth telluride and bismuth selenide alloys for lower-temperature (approximately room temperature) applications, lead telluride alloys for intermediate 200[deg] to 500[deg] C) applications, and silicon germanium alloys for high temperature (400[deg] to 1000[deg] C).
Headquartered in Saxonburg, Pennsylvania, with manufacturing, sales, and distribution facilities worldwide, the Company produces numerous crystalline compounds including zinc selenide for infrared laser optics, silicon carbide for high-power electronic and microwave applications, and bismuth telluride for thermoelectric coolers.
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Scientists succeeded in showing the promise of surface-conduction channels in topological insulator nanoribbons made of bismuth telluride and demonstrate that surface states in these nanoribbons are 'tunable' - able to be turned on and off depending on the position of the Fermi level.
Hidden inside a device for chilling wine is the unusual compound called bismuth telluride.
Physicists at the Department of Energy's (DOE) SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have revealed that this material is called bismuth telluride.