Biwa


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Biwa

(bē`wä), lake, c.40 mi (60 km) long and from 2 to 12 mi (3.2–19 km) wide, Shiga prefecture, S Honshu, Japan. The lake, shaped like the biwa, a musical instrument, is the largest in Japan and is a popular scenic resort. It abounds in fish, harbors a pearl culture industry, and is famous in Japanese legends. Canals from the lake to Kyoto provide water supply and a transportation route.
References in periodicals archive ?
BAGHDAD / NINA / The economic security adviser in Kurdistan, Biwa Khansi said that "continued stopped pumping oil through Kirkuk-Ceyhan line will reflect negatively on the country's economy and economic relations between Iraq and Turkey .
Sherwin-Williams' reports that their customers rely on them to provide the latest coating technologies that meet industry accepted performance standards such as KCMA, AWI and BIWA.
The six models, which are for forklifts and hydraulic shovels, are produced at its Biwa plant in Nagahama, Shiga Prefecture.
But the research facility lay near Japan's largest lake, Lake Biwa, and the bluegill escaped into the wild.
Kada Yukiko, a former academic and researcher on the environment of Lake Biwa, bid for the governorship in 2006 in a campaign to reduce what she called "wasteful" public works in Shiga prefecture.
Kada has said her concern about nuclear power generation stems from her association with Lake Biwa in Shiga Prefecture, a key source of water for the Kansai region centering on Osaka.
We will create a new party, in response to people saying they don't have any party to choose from at the moment," Kada told a press conference near Lake Biwa, Japan's largest, in a region with a number of ageing nuclear reactors.
In addition to the biwa there is the shakuhachi (Japanese flute) played by Daisuke Kaminaga, and taiko drums and percussion played by Masayoshi Tanaka.
Matsumoto explained he started Rock of Asia because he wanted to incorporate the use of traditional Japanese instruments in contemporary music, showing the audience his own instrument, the Biwa.
For example, the Japanese biwa and koto, the related fretted Japanese lute and zither, were often used by performers to tell stories--not entirely dissimilar from typical hummel performance.