Black Africa


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Black Africa

 

a term used in scholarly works, political writings, and literature to denote African countries populated by negroid races. The French term Afrique noire first appeared in the second half of the 19th century, when France’s colonial empire was taking shape in West and Equatorial Africa. The German term Schwarzafrika has not gained wide use. In English, the term “Negro Africa” has largely been replaced by “Black Africa,” “Subsanaran Africa,” and “Africa south of the Sahara,” the last of which is also coming into use in French. The last term is accepted in Soviet writings.

References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: (L-R) The two captains of Black Africa and African Stars wearing the new kits that Standard Bank Namibia donated to them for the Standard Bank Super Cup soccer match that will be played this Friday at the Sam Nujoma Stadium.
And yet, the West has taken many precautions to destroy this majestic history of Black Africa, since the sixteenth century.
Aswan itself is a bustling city, where Egypt meets black Africa.
I grew up an Englishman in black Africa and believe cultural symbolism to be very important.
The Arts of Black Africa by Jean Laude University of California Press, April 1971 $21.
Jeffrey Taylor's Angry Wind: Tyhrough Muslim Black Africa By Truck, Bus, Boat And Camel is an engrossing travelogue of Taylor's journey which also conveys important cultural insights which are not to be missed by any who would understand Muslim black African sentiments and environment.
In the historical record we have seen that a scattered or exiled Judaism was more or less removed from the temptations of slave-holding, while Muslim societies constructed a variable and nuanced view of blackness and the slave--for example extending the faith into Black Africa, while continuing the enslavement of non-Muslim blacks.
There seemed to be many possibilities for development in the country, which was being touted internationally as a beacon of hope in black Africa as well as a model for neighbouring South Africa, still suffering under Apartheid.
The book competently presents an archaeological, architectural and historical survey covering a period from the pre-Islamic Iron Age in black Africa to the sixteenth-century Moroccan incursions against the Songhai, the nineteenth-century Fulani jihads in Hausaland, and the last of the Omani Sultans in Zanzibar.
Black Africa was nearly completely colonized, its inhabitants according to Chinese accounts little more than slaves, not an unlikely destiny for the motherland without timely and effective actions.
In another brilliant, surrealistic account, "The Crocodiles of Yamoussoukro" (the title refers to a weird private presidential zoo), about the Ivory Coast, which at the time (1983) was one of the more stable and functional countries in Black Africa, Naipaul speaks with an old Ivory Coast "hand.