Black Africa


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Black Africa

 

a term used in scholarly works, political writings, and literature to denote African countries populated by negroid races. The French term Afrique noire first appeared in the second half of the 19th century, when France’s colonial empire was taking shape in West and Equatorial Africa. The German term Schwarzafrika has not gained wide use. In English, the term “Negro Africa” has largely been replaced by “Black Africa,” “Subsanaran Africa,” and “Africa south of the Sahara,” the last of which is also coming into use in French. The last term is accepted in Soviet writings.

References in periodicals archive ?
In her groundbreaking book "Feminism and Oppression in Black Africa," she argues that these practices are neither remote nor barbaric but part of a sewn in culture of violence from men towards women.
No longer, moreover, was cultural influence flowing one way out of a timeless African motherland; the emphasis now was on a newly intensified "exchange of knowledge" between black America and black Africa.
Caption: (L-R) The two captains of Black Africa and African Stars wearing the new kits that Standard Bank Namibia donated to them for the Standard Bank Super Cup soccer match that will be played this Friday at the Sam Nujoma Stadium.
One may conclude that in Black Africa, the most dominant phenomenon is underage girl prostitution.
The editorial guidance for these essays appears far superior to Ojaide's past books, including Poetic Imagination in Black Africa, Ordering the African Imagination, and Culture, Society, and Politics in Modern African Literature, among others.
Robert Bauval & Thomas Brophy are an Egyptologist and an astronomer respectively, and offer their own evidence for their argument to put Black Africa back in charge of the origins of civilization.
Ten African Heroes: The Sweep of Independence in Black Africa by Thomas Patrick Melady and Margaret Badum Melady (Orbis, 2011)
In Africa and the American Negro, Fortune's article is concerned with the colonization of black Africa by white European political powers, and, in The Negro Problem, his article is concerned with the status at the beginning of the twentieth century of black Americans economically, socially, and so on, as well as politically.
Because of this a new edition, an excerpt of his travels through Central Asia, is to be welcomed (a sort of companion to Markus Weiner's Ibn Battuta in Black Africa, edited and translated by Hamdun and King).
A Pan-Africanism that can cure Black Africa of the weakness and powerlessness that made slavery, colonialism and racism possible; a powerlessness that has today exposed us to extermination--as through the AIDS bomb and other biological weapons of mass destruction that target only people with black skin; through destroying our food security and autonomy by obliging us to use genetically modified seeds, and through the policies of impoverishment imposed by the IMF-World Bank-WTO regimen.
Black Africa has taken a big hit from the economic crisis.