Black Hoods

Black Hoods

 

(Russian, Chernye Klobuki), members of a Turkic alliance that was formed circa the mid-12th century in the forest-steppe regions of Rus’ (primarily along the Ros’ River) from surviving groups of such peoples as the Pechenegs, Torks, and Berendei, who had settled there in the second half of the 11th century. As vassals of Rus’, the Black Hoods were required to guard the southern borders of the state and to take part in the campaigns of the Kievan princes. As they gradually turned from nomadic stock raising to land cultivation, feudal relations developed among them. In the 13th century, after the Mongol-Tatar invasion, some of the Black Hoods intermingled with the Russian population, and some left to roam the steppe.

REFERENCES

Pletneva, S. A. Drevnosti Chernykh Klobukov. (Arkheologia SSSR: Svod arkheologicheskikh islochnikov, fascs. E 1–19.) Moscow, 1973.
References in classic literature ?
In the distance she saw creatures with black hoods, such as appear in dreams.
A group of vandals, some wearing black hoods, smashed store windows and bank ATM machines, set a public bus on fire, and destroyed subway and bus ticket machines.
The sculpture's careful casting allows the weight of the bronze to seem ghostly, its disembodied hairiness suggesting Balzac's robe, a strange kind of burka, or the black hoods of Abu Ghraib.
In a CIA-controlled facility at Bagram air base in Afghanistan, captured al-Qaeda operatives and Taliban commanders "are sometimes kept standing or kneeling for hours, in black hoods or spray-painted goggles," reported the December 26th Washington Post.