Black Hoods

Black Hoods

 

(Russian, Chernye Klobuki), members of a Turkic alliance that was formed circa the mid-12th century in the forest-steppe regions of Rus’ (primarily along the Ros’ River) from surviving groups of such peoples as the Pechenegs, Torks, and Berendei, who had settled there in the second half of the 11th century. As vassals of Rus’, the Black Hoods were required to guard the southern borders of the state and to take part in the campaigns of the Kievan princes. As they gradually turned from nomadic stock raising to land cultivation, feudal relations developed among them. In the 13th century, after the Mongol-Tatar invasion, some of the Black Hoods intermingled with the Russian population, and some left to roam the steppe.

REFERENCES

Pletneva, S. A. Drevnosti Chernykh Klobukov. (Arkheologia SSSR: Svod arkheologicheskikh islochnikov, fascs. E 1–19.) Moscow, 1973.
References in classic literature ?
In the distance she saw creatures with black hoods, such as appear in dreams.
D'Artagnan observed, on the bench nearest to the pillar against which Porthos leaned, sort of ripe beauty, rather yellow and rather dry, but erect and haughty under her black hood.
It was plain that this mode of proceeding piqued the lady in the black hood, for she bit her lips till they bled, scratched the end of her nose, and could not sit still in her seat.
The lady with the black hood followed through all their wanderings the looks of Porthos, and perceived that they rested upon the lady with the velvet cushion, the little Negro, and the maid-servant.
The lady with the red cushion produced a great effect--for she was very handsome--upon the lady with he black hood, who saw in her a rival really to be dreaded; a great effect upon Porthos, who thought her much prettier than the lady with the black hood; a great effect upon D'Artagnan, who recognized in her the lady of Meung, of Calais, and of Dover, whom his persecutor, the man with the scar, had saluted by the name of Milady.
He guessed that the lady of the black hood was the procurator's wife of the Rue aux Ours, which was the more probable from the church of St.
A mysterious, remorseless whisper came from within the motionless black hood at my side.
I murmured, fascinated by the black hood turned immovably over the stern, as if in unlawful communion with that old sea of magicians, slave-dealers, exiles and warriors, the sea of legends and terrors, where the mariners of remote antiquity used to hear the restless shade of an old wanderer weep aloud in the dark.
She wore her black hood and was bundled up in shawls.
Dominic's hooded cloak would envelop her amply, and her face under the black hood would have a luminous quality, adolescent charm, and an enigmatic expression.
The housekeeper felt a little appalled, when, after cloaks, coats, shawls, and socks had been taken off in succession, the large black hood was removed, and the dark ringlets, shining like the raven’s wing, fell from her head, and left the sweet but commanding features of the young lady exposed to view.
Over the head and face of every prisoner who comes into this melancholy house, a black hood is drawn; and in this dark shroud, an emblem of the curtain dropped between him and the living world, he is led to the cell from which he never again comes forth, until his whole term of imprisonment has expired.