Black Power


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Black Power

a social, economic, and political movement of Black people, esp in the US, to obtain equality with Whites
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to playing a vital role in the establishment of Black Studies departments and being enmeshed in the Civil Rights and Black Power movements, the Department of Pan-African Studies has also been central to many more contemporary struggles that include and expand beyond the university, including:
In effect, Berger argues that these movements should be viewed with more continuity than previously thought, as most scholars have viewed the radicalism of the Black Power years as distinct from the Civil Rights movement.
I'm hoping that she'll be inserted in books and discussions about intersectionality and the various genealogies and strands of Black Power that included Black women's leadership.
The essays by Rupert Lewis, on Jamaican Black Power in the 1960s, and Anthony Bogues, on the structure and role of the newspaper Abeng, demonstrate the important role of a radicalized black intelligentsia in promoting Black Power in Jamaica.
Heitner establishes this link, taking James Smethurst's cue that Black Power is 'the political wing of Black arts'.
Emerging first in the United States, Black Power had split from the black civil rights movement and, under the guidance of prominent figures such as Stokely Carmichael and Malcolm X, advocated more direct, faster and bolder political actions.
Since the publication of Black Power, Wright's rendering of "Africa" and African people has been critiqued for issues ranging from Wright's ethnographic impulse to his insistence on Western notions of modernization.
Theoretically, Black Power TV builds on Jurgen Habermas' and Catherine Squires' work on the public sphere.
Additionally, the world-historical/cultural nature of Black Power that electrified the Black Atlantic is being connected to the constant resistance of enslaved Africans of which the greatest expression is the Haitian revolution (Harris 1998; Singh 2004; West 2005; Martin, West, Wilkins 2009; Bogues 2009; Barlow 2010).
This image of Christian womanhood, purity and Black Power flashed through my mind after a recent overload of information about Black Power and Black Arts Movements in the 1960s and 1970s.
THE SOUNDS OF BLACK POWER, 1965-1975 BY PAT THOMAS, Fantagraphics, 204 pages, $39.
I chose Black Power in Trinidad and Tobago during the 1960s and 1970s as one of the main topics of the course, but rather than examine it in local or national terms, I sought to situate Black Power in Trinidad and Tobago in its proper place in world history.